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Depositions after the 1641 Rebellion

Repository :

Public Record Office for Northern Ireland

   

PRONI Reference :

MIC8/2

   

Title :

Ulster Depositions 1641: Co. Fermanagh

   

Dates :

1641-1643

   

Description

Ulster Depositions 1641: Co. Fermanagh

1. Ann Marshall of Castle Waterhouse in the county of Fermanagh, widow [being duly sworn] deposeth:

That she was robbed and lost [in household goods worth £20, 23 beasts worth £40 in all amounting to £60] her goods worth £60 by the means of Rory Maguire and Lieutenant Graham, and about 200 other rebels rising in rebellion with them vizt about the 26th day of October last past about 11 o'clock in the morning.

And [further deposeth] that the said Rory Maguire and Lieutenant Graham of "Lisneskea" being in company with the said 200 rebels, some of the said rebels most cruelly "murthered" William Marshall husband unto this deponent, giving him 6 several mortal wounds and then said that the Scots were at that time sent to leave never a drop of English blood in England and that the Irish now had authority and the command from the King to leave never a drop of English blood in Ireland.

And further deposeth that the common speech of the said rebels was that they were the Queen's soldiers. And further (?) that she was at the same time stripped naked by the rebels; as also having some clothes bestowed on her, was again stripped by other rebels as she travelled towards Dublin.

Sworn 3rd January 1641 before Roger Puttock and Henry Brereton. [Examined].

2. Thomas Knowles of Newtowne alis Castlecoole in the parish of Drumully [half barony of Coole and county of Fermanagh yeoman an English protestant of the age of 41 years or thereabouts, being duly sworn] deposeth that in the beginning of the rebellion he was dispossessed robbed [and lost in lands and houses holden in fee farm to him and his heirs forever within the township of Newtowne aforesaid worth £240, in leases worth £80, in cattle worth £214, in corn worth £50 in household goods and other goods and provision in the house worth £200, in hay the worth of £20 in debts £40 in ready money £9 in husbandry "geare" and other goods in the kiln barn and stable worth £20, in all amounting to the sum of eight hundred three score and thirteen pounds] and deprived of his goods and "meanes" worth £875 by the means of Captain Rory Maguire of Hassetstowne in the barony of Lurge and county aforesaid, Donogh Maguire of [ ] in the said county esquire uncle to the Lord Maguire, Richard Newgent esquire father-in-law to the said Lord Maguire, Thomas oge Maguire of the barony of "Kineawly" in the said county gent, Hugh McMaghan servant to the said Lord Maguire, Phelim Maguire of "Aghelaye" in the said county gent, James Nettervill the younger and his brother both sons to James Nettervill the elder of Magharestaphan in the said county esquire and other Irish persons armed and with them assembled in a rebellious manner to the number of 400 at the least, the 24th October last past. And then sent a note in writing unto the English protestants (that for their refuge had taken themselves into the church of Newtowne aforesaid) requiring them in the King's name to yield unto them their arms weapons and town otherwise they should feel the strength of their "forcs and swordes" or to that effect which note was subscribed with the names of Donogh Maguire and James Nettervill captains, unto which note the protestants sent an answer desiring to see their authority, which they refused to do but that night encamped themselves near unto the said town. And the protestants finding themselves weak both in men provision and munition, the next morning were contented to yield their arms, upon condition that they might have their lives apparell and some part of their goods, unto which the said rebels condescended and agreed, but so soon as they had gotten the possession of the church and the protestants arms, they stripped all or most of them and kept this deponent and his wife and Abraham James and his wife prisoners within the said church, and during this deponent's imprisonment with them the said Hugh McMahon and one Patr[ick] Maguire told this deponent that they had a commission from his majesty for what they did and that the like actions were done throughout the whole kingdom at that time, their plot having "bin" working for 2 years last past and that certainly God had a great hand in the same.

All places of the protestants abroad being taken and yielded except three viz. Londonderry "Eniskillin" and another town, this deponent not now remembering the name thereof and that those towns could not long withstand their "forcs" because the Lord Maguire had taken Dublin Castle as they said the Saturday before, otherwise if it had not been taken, and that their plot had been discovered the said Lord Maguire had been with them again on Saturday aforesaid and further told this deponent that but for a "naughtie" Irish woman that had discovered their plot to Sir William Cole knight, upon the Friday morning "Eneskillin" had "bin" taken but the said Sir William had broken down both the bridges and gotten into the Island to him both men and "provition". And for the woman that had discovered it she should repent it if she could be taken.

And further this deponent deposeth that the next day being the 26th day of October, this deponent his wife and 2 children with the rest of the English protestants of the said parish, was by the said rebels forced and compelled to leave the said town and county, and within "two howres" after the said rebels set the said town on fire consisting of fifty houses or thereabouts as this deponent hath heard. And he himself did about that time see a great "smoake" thereabouts and "soe beleeveth" it to be true.

And further this deponent deposeth that he heard William Morton a credible man say that he did see certain of his household goods in the house of the Bishop of Clogher at Drumbrockus, and that a Sootish servant to the said Bishop told him that the said Bishop had appointed to meet the said Captain Rorie Maguire with 300 men the said 26th October to help him to take "Eneskillin". And further this deponent deposeth that the said rebels had "murthered" forty of the said parishioners or thereabouts and wounded a great many. And that there is at least one hundred of the said parishioners that lived in good manner, perished and dead since they were driven from their "habitacons" by the said rebels as aforesaid, being all of them English protestants.

Sworn 3rd January 1641 before Henry Jones and Roger Puttock. [Examined].

3. Alice Tibbs of Ringvilly in the parish of Drumully barony of Clankelly and county of Fermanagh widow [an English protestant aged 38 years or thereabouts, being duly sworn] deposeth that her husband Maximillian Tibbs was murdered and slain near unto Shaneck in the said county by the Irish rebels the 23rd day of October last, but doth not certainly know the man that did the same but heard that Hugh McCahell of Drumballagh in the said barony and county aforesaid did murder him. And further (?) that she this deponent was afterwards robbed of and lost her goods and means worth £469 [of leases of land worth vizt of Ringvilly Kilrowte and Knockmakeggan in the said barony worth £100; in corn worth £160 in cattle worth £92 in hay worth £4, in household goods provision and husbandry "geare" worth £60 in debts £33 in ready money £20 in in all amounting to the sum of £400 three score and nine pounds] by Patrick McCollo McDonnell of the "Colledge" lands in the said county gent, Art McDonnell of the same gent, and divers (?) other Irish rebels of the company of Rory Maguire of "Hassetstowne" in the barony of Lurge and county aforesaid the 24th day of the said "moneth" of October in the daytime.

And further deposeth that she hath heard Cahell Boy McDermott of Kilrowte in the said barony of Clankelly and county aforesaid say that Dublin Castle was taken and that they could afford the English 2 or 3 "barrells" of powder, and that the Irish within one fortnight would have a new king or words to that effect which words he "spoake" in the hearing of her this deponent and of Avis Braishaw wife to John Braishaw and Thomas Middlebrooke the 26th day of the same month of October.

And did also hear another Irishman (whose name she knoweth not) say that it was "pitty" that any of the English or their breed should be suffered to live for fear they should grow strong again, or words to that effect.

Sworn 4th January 1641 before Roger Puttock and Henry Brereton. [Examined].

4. Thomas Middlebrooke of Leag mcCaffry in the parish of Drumully [half barony of Coole] and county of Fermanagh yeoman [an English protestant, of the age of 31 years or thereabouts being duly sworn] deposeth that he was robbed and deprived of his goods and means worth £164 14s. [lost in leases of the half Leage mcCaffry and Agharousk (?) in the barony aforesaid worth £40, in cattle worth £40 in corn worth £60 in debts £5 in household goods provision and husbandry gear £15 in ready money £4 14s. in all amounting to the sum of one hundred sixty four pounds fourteen shillings] by Owen McDonnell of Knockmakeggan in the said county, Hugh Bedy McDonnell of Leige mcCaffry aforesaid, Cahell Boy McDermott of Kilrout in the barony of Clankelly and county aforesaid and Patrick McACorry of Leg McCaffry aforesaid, being rebels, that did rise up in arms with Captain Rory Maguire and Patrick mcCollo McDonnell of Clankelly aforesaid in the said county, gent, the 24th day of October last in the daytime.

And further this deponent deposeth that the 26th day of the said month he heard the said Cahell Buy McDermott say that within one fortnight they should have a new king of Ireland crowned, one of the oNeales or words to that effect, which was spoken by the said Cahell in the presence of [the said] Alice Tibbs, this deponent's sister and Avis Brashaw wife to John Braishawe.

And further sayeth (?) that he hath heard that the rebels have murdered about three score English protestants that lived in good manner within the said parish. And further sayeth that there cannot be "soefew" as one hundred English protestants (that lived in good manner within the said parish) perished and dead since the said rebels did banish and drive them from their habitations.

Sworn 4th January 1641 before Roger Puttock and Henry Brereton. [Examined].

5. Elizabeth Coates of Donnaghe in the parish of Drumully barony of Clankelly and county of Fermanagh [widow aged 53 years or thereabouts being duly sworn] deposeth that on the 23rd October last she and her husband Christopher Coats gent were robbed and deprived of goods and means [lost in cattle worth £100 in corn and hay worth £40 in household goods and provision for the house worth £60, three fowling "peeces" and a rapier worth £3, in husbandry gear worth 40s. in debt worth £2 in ready moneys £26, one lease of the tate of land called Donnogh for 18 years from May day last or thereabouts worth £140 in all] amounting to the sum of £377 and of all "escripts and writinges" that her husband then had, by means of Captain Rorie Maguire of Hassetstown in the barony of Lurg and county aforesaid Donogh Maguire of the barony of Magharestaphany in the county aforesaid esquire uncle to the said Lord Maguire, Richard Newgent esquire father-in-law to the said Lord Maguire and other English persons to the number [of] "or" 30 or thereabouts of the company of the said Captain Rory Maguire and the rest.

And further deposeth that the said 23"th" day of October this deponent's husband and Christopher Coats her "sonn" were murdered and slain by Shane McMaghan a tenant to the Lord Maguire and others of the said company. And this deponent herself and her daughter "Margrett" sore wounded in their dwelling house at Donogh aforesaid one peirce McGilcoskill, "here" neighbour to this deponent, being the man that wounded this deponent with a sword upon the back part of her head, and upon her right hand and sore bruised this deponent with other blows upon her head face and body and afterwards the 25th day of October last some of the said Captain Rory his company at Newtoune in the said county stripped this deponent and two of her children.

And further deposeth that she heard some of the said rebellious company then say and ask the English Protestants that were there robbed what they intended to do or whither to go, saying unto them if they went for Dublin, that was taken by the Lord Maguire upon Saturday before and there they should find small "releef"; if for England or Scotland it was as "badd" there as here, saying further that what they did they had the king's commission for it.

And further deposeth that she the said [Elizabeth Coates] 25th October did see Lieutenant William Greham of Lisamallett in the barony of Clankelly and county aforesaid Ambrose Carlton a kinsman to the said Lieutenant, Arthur Greham brother to the said Lieutenant and 2 of his sons vizt Edmond and Francis all in the company of the said Captain Rory at Newtoune aforesaid, who was neither aiding nor adviseing to this deponent but passed to and fro in the said company of rebels without any molestation or harm. And did also see the same day and place in their company one Andrew Erwin of Balle-Belfore in the said county gent and David Little of Balle Belfore aforesaid "pyper (whoe playd vpon his pipes before the said Irish rebbels when they tooke the church at Newtowne from the English protestants". And sayeth she hath eight children alive within this kingdom which are unprovided for and she hath no "manteinance" for them.

Sworn 4th January 1641 before Ran[dolph] Adams and John Watson. [Examined]

6. Avis Braishaw the wife of John Braishaw late of Agharouskymore in the parish of Drumully [half barony of Coole] in the county of Fermanagh [who is now gone down to Drogheda in his majesty's service as a soldier under the command of Captain Townley, she this deponent being an English protestant aged 16 years or thereabouts sworn and examined] deposeth and sayeth that her said husband was deprived robbed and lost the 23"th" day of October last his goods and means [certain lands vizt Agherouskymoore holden by him in lease worth £38, in cattle worth £45, corn worth £20 debts worth £127 in household goods provision and other goods worth £13 in all amounting to the sum of £243] by Arte McShane McDonnell of Eriney in the barony of Clankelly and county aforesaid, Shane o'Rork of the same, and Patr[ick] McACorry of the barony of Coole and county aforesaid rebels that did rise and take up arms with Captain Rory Maguire (as she heard).

And further deposeth that she heard Cahell Buy McDermot of Kilrout in the barony of Clankelly and county aforesaid say, that Dublin Castle was taken and that they could afford the English 3 or 4 barrels of powder and that the Irish would have a new king within a fortnight after, which words, or words to that effect, he "spake" in the hearing of this deponent, and of Thomas Middlebrooke and A[l]ice Tibbs the 25th day of October aforesaid.

And further deposeth that Ambrose Carlton of Conidg[ ] in the county of "Monoghan" gent was present with the said rebels when the goods were taken as she heard.

Sworn 4th January 1641 before Roger Puttock and Henry Brereton. [Examined]

7. Grace Louett the wife of Francis Louett of Ballewhillan in the parish of Drumully barony of Clankelly and county of Fermanagh the reliot of John Presley of Ballewhillan aforesaid deceased, of the age of 49 years or thereabouts being duly sworn, deposeth that she was robbed and deprived [or (?) lost] of her own estate [one lease of the tate and quarter of a tate of land called Ballewhillan bequeathed unto her by the last will and testament of her said late husband John Presley, being part and parcel of the proportion of Mannor Heygate, for and during her life, worth £12 per annum vlt [ ] Popris (?), in cattle worth £36, in corn worth £10, in household goods and provision worth £12, in all amounting to the sum of four score and twelve pounds besides the said lease being of the yearly value aforesaid] by the means of Patrick McCollo McDonnell of the "Colledg" lands in the said barony of Clankelly and county aforesaid gent, Edmund McDonnell of the same gent with divers other Irish rebels to the number of 100 or thereabouts with them assembled together in arms the 25th day of October last past or thereabouts about seven of the clock in the morning [and further deposeth that her said late husband by his said last will and testament bequeathes the rents and profits of one tate of land called Kilmore being part and parcel of the said manor of Mannor Heygate of the clear rent of 9 10s. (besides the rent thereout due to the Lord of the said manor) unto Grace Presley this deponent's daughter for 4 years unto Suzan Presley another of the deponent's daughters for 4 years after the end of the said first 4 years, unto Ann Presley another of this deponent's daughters for 4 years after the expiration of the said 8 years and afterwards bequeathed the said tate of land (after the expiration of the said 12 years) unto James Presley this deponent's younger son. And further by his said will bequeathed the tate of land called Tawnetabulke unto the deponent's said daughters Grace Suzan and Ann, to be equally divided amongst them, if it should please God to take away Simon Presley another of this deponent's sons out of this world without issue of his body lawfully begotten. As also the said tate and quarter of a tate of land called Ballewhillan unto the said James after the decease of this deponent and her said son Symon (if he died without issue)].

And as this deponent hath heard that Symon her son is murdered and slain by some of the rebels in the north at or near Blessingburne in the county of Tyrone [the said several parcels of land being part and parcel of the said proportion of Mannor Heygate and being "houlden" in lease for 34 years or thereabouts from the first day of All Saints last at and under the yearly rent of £3. And further deposeth that the said Patrick McCollo McDonnell, Edmund McDonnell and the rest of their company the said 25th October last entered upon  the said several parcels of land, ousted this deponent and her said children and also took away the lease writings will and "escripts" which this deponent had that con[ ]ued the state of the said several parcels of land].

And further deposeth that she heard one of the company of Captain Rory Maguire (who as this deponent heard was a "freere") say that it was well that this deponent was "comen" into their company to save her life for if she should go for Dublin it would be as bad and if she went for England it would be worse for, said he, we have the king's "broade seale" for what we do and the reason of our rising is because the Puritans preferred a petition against us and could not let us enjoy our religion quietly for we stand for our lives and if we should not have done this we had all lost our lives upon one day, or words to that effect.

And further this deponent deposeth that she her husband and 4 children were all stripped naked by the said rebels belonging to the said Captain Rory, the said 25th day of October last at Newtowne alias Castlecoole.

Sworn 5th January 1641 before Henry Jones and Henry Brereton. [Examined]

8. Nathaniell Higginson of the castle of Knockballymore within the county of Fermanagh gent being duly sworn deposeth that about the 23th of October last in the evening he was robbed and dispoiled at Knockballymore aforesaid by Rory Maguire of the county of Fermanagh, Captain oDonnell and their "souldiers" of the same county of his goods and means worth £1,126 [his goods vizt in money £204, in English "cowes yong and old" £300, in corn £100, in household goods and "fyer" £100, in wearing "apparell" and plate £50, mares and geldings £40, in "hoggs" £12, in bills bonds and debts £240. And this deponent was and is by the rebels aforesaid "expulced" from the possession of his house and farm whereon he had bestowed great charges in building "hedging" and "fenceing", his interest therein being worth £80 so that his losses in all come to the sum of £1,126].

And further deposeth that the rebels aforesaid then said that they had a commission or broad seal from the king for what they did and when they had vanquished or overrun this kingdom they would go over into England where they would have the assistance of Spain and France for overcoming the same.

And further saith that the said rebels having stripped this deponent and his wife and family of all their clothes, and turned them away naked, and having gotten some other clothes from their friends at Belturbett, he this deponent and his wife and family were about "tenn" days after near Belturbet in the county of Cavan again stripped and despoiled of those clothes by Phillip o'Reily of [ ] within the county of Cavan esquire Captain of the rebels and divers others of the Relyes and others being a great number. And then the said rebels or some of them most "greevously" wounded and struck this deponent on his head, and other parts of his body so as he hardly escaped his life nor is yet recovered of his strength and health.

And further saith that the rebels of Fermanagh aforesaid killed one of this deponent's tenants and at the least four score English protestants more and wounded hurt and stripped many others and indeed so many of the English as dwelt there abouts. And to add more misery to the protestants the foresaid rebels killed few of them outright but left them in ditches and other places mortally wounded and stripped of clothes where they languished and "pyned" to death. The rebels then affirming that their priests commanded them so to do.

Sworn 7th January 1641 before Roger Puttock and Henry Brereton. [Examined]

9. Richard Knowles of Newtowne alias Castlecoole [in the parish of Drumully half of barony of Coole] and county of Fermanagh yeoman [an English protestant aged 53 years or thereabouts being duly sworn] deposeth that he was robbed and lost his goods worth £66 [a lease of part of Drumrenybegg worth £8, in cattle worth £37, in hay 40s., in household goods worth £8, in ready moneys and debts due £11, in all amounting to £66] by [ ] the means of Captain Rory Maguire of Hassetstowne in the barony of Lurge and county of Fermanagh aforesaid esquire, Donogh Maguire of [ ] in the said county esquire, uncle to the Lord Maguire, Richard Newgent esquire father-in-law to the said Lord Maguire and other Irish rebels assembled together with the said Captain Rory in arms the 25th day of October or thereabouts about twelve of the clock in the daytime.

And further deposeth that this deponent his wife and three children were all stripped by some of the said rebels. And also deposeth that the said day he did see Thomas Lane of Newtowne aforesaid gent aged 80 years or thereabouts receive one mortal wound in his head by some of the said rebels (but knoweth not the name of the party that gave it) of which wound he died. And did likewise see the same day Robert Lund (?) of the said parish being an English protestant stripped naked by some of the said company and afterwards by two of them pursued being armed with pikes [and wishing him to run for his life] and he striving to outrun them was met with by two other of the rebels in the said town street who held 2 pikes against him and turned him back upon these that pursued him, who with the said pikes struck him down to the ground where he lay for the space of 2 hours, and afterwards this deponent did see the said Lund rise up and go away. But this deponent "verely beleeveth" that by reason of the said "stroak" which the said Lund then had given him he died, or is since murdered by some of the rebels, because he hath not since been heard of.

And this deponent did oredibly hear that some of the said rebellious company did murder Christopher Cotes the elder Christopher Coates the younger Christopher Bowcer the elder Christopher Bowcer the younger, William Marshall, Thomas Bulmin (?), Charles Randall, Francis Wilkinson, Henry Wilkinson, Peter Maddeson, Humphrey Brockhowse, William Browne, Maximilian Tibbs, Thomas Sergeant, George Dickenson, Richard Lewis, Stephen Ripon (?), Anthony Barlow, Edward Poulter, John Maine, coroner of that county, Thomas Presley, Francis Somner, Richard Butler, John Chadwick and divers other men women and children, this deponent not now remembering their names.

And further deposeth that there is one hundred of the said parishioners that lived in good "ranck" and fashion that were driven out of their habitations and banished by the said rebellious Irish and that near all English protestants perished and dead. And this deponent is the rather confident that there is one hundred or more dead by reason the daily die in such abundance, this deponent well knowing the said parishioners being his neighbours and being a butcher by trade had some dealings with the most of them. And further sayeth that some of the said rebels said that they had a king of their own in Ireland.

Sworn 10th January 1641 before John Watson and William Aldrich. [Examined]

10. John Bight, butcher, an innkeeper, an English protestant late of Newtowne alias Castlecoole [in the parish of Newtowne, barony of Castlecoole] and county of Fermanagh [being duly sworn] deposeth and sayth that on Monday the 25th October last, Rory Maguire with [at best (?)] about 1,500 others whose names he knoweth not took from him violently in Newtowne aforesaid out of his this deponent's dwelling-house, his money goods and chattels [in money £8, in household goods wearing clothes 4 "beeves" ready killed "beare for his inkeeping" and other household provision, 30 stone or thereabouts of tallow to the value of £50, the benefit of a lease of an house lately built by himself with an "holmstead" thereunto belonging worth £16, in all he lost to the worth of £74].

This deponent further saith that Rory Maguire "shewed" to him and others whom he then robbed a parchment or paper with a great seal affixed which he affirmed to be a warrant from the king's majesty for what he did. And he further deposeth that when he and his neighbours (then robbed) complained of their miserable condition (being robbed and stripped) the said Rory replied that if they were not content with what was done they should see worse within a few days.

Sworn 5th January 1641 before us "Ranulphe" Adams and John Watson. [Examined]

11. Ann Gill of Newtowne in the county of Fermanagh widow being duly sworn saith that about "Allhalloutide" last at Newtowne aforesaid, she this deponent by the rebels was robbed and dispoiled of all her goods [household goods, apparel, fruits of her garden and her house burned to the value of [ ] and her losses of at least 20 nobles sterling] and by reason this deponent hath lost her sight, she could not "discry" the rebels whereby to name them but she is credibly informed by her neighbours it was by Rory Maguire and his company.

And this deponent further saith that when the said Rory Maguire had taken the church at Newtowne aforesaid he the said Rory (in the presence and hearing of her this deponent and a great many of her neighbours, the king's majesty's loving subjects) gave forth that it was to know purpose for them to fly to Dublin for succour for Dublin was taken by the Lord Maguire who was to be king of Ireland.

Sworn 29th January 1641 before John Sterne and William Aldrich. [Examined]

12. Nicholas Willoughby of Carrow in the half barony of Coole in the country of Fermanagh, parish of Galoone alias Dartry esquire sworn sayeth that about the end of October 1641 or thereabouts and since he was robbed spoiled [and des[ ]led] of his goods and "chattells" within the counties of Fermanagh and Monoghan "their five lines must stand" [according as in this following particular (to the best of his remembrance) followeth, in corn in "hagard" wheat] "beare" and oats £120, wheat and "beare sowen" in the county of "Monoghan" (as he guessed) about 35 acres valued unto £70, about 200 oxen and cows with younger cattle at £2 "a peece" for 200 and 10s. "a peece" for 40, all which at that rate amounts unto £420, two hundred and forty sheep at 3s. 4d. a sheep [forty pounds, stud mares and other horses, mares, colts and "garrans" about 40 as he remembreth at £2 10s. the head £100; in hay and turf £9, lost in ready money as he "beleeveth and remembreth" about £800 but he will but set down £700; in plate "howshold goodes apparell lynen" and other necessaries belonging to the house which as he doth rent are worth £275; due to him by bills and "bondes arreres of rent" and otherwise together with the half " yeres" rent due at "Lamas Michaelmas and All Halloutide last £1,454; in leases vizt one lease of 35 tates in the county of "Monoghan" for about 36 years to come yielded him £303 per annum, and after the expiration of 3 years it would have yielded him £60 more per annum (as he valueth it for he did set 4 tates of it for 21 years after the said 3 years expired) for forty pounds increase of rent, and the rest would have yielded him £20 more, if peace had continued, but he "rateth" only but what it paid in present £303; out of this he paid the landlord £210; another lease of 20 tates within the county of "Monoghan" for about 56 years which yielded him in rent and customs £139 per annum, out of which he paid the landlord £60 per annum; another lease of 25 tates in the county of Fermanagh for about 56 years to come yielded him yearly £172, out of which he paid the landlord £60 per annum. He had in "morgage" for moneys lent one lease for about 15 years to come and another for about 26 years to come; he valueth the profits of both and the rest at £33 per annum. The sum in leases per annum is £647. And he had 3 tates for 1,000 years, and the rest he had in freehold. The yearly rent he made of it, valuing what he kept under his stock he estimateth unto £221 10s., as his particular may show, out of which he paid the king and landlords £21 10s., so there rests clear £200 per annum of which profits of leases and lands he is like to be deprived until a peace be settled. The sum totals of the goods, money, debts and arrears of rents is £3,188. The sum of the leases per annum is £647. The sum of the freehold per annum is £221 10s. Sum of all is £4,056 10s., which losses he sustained by the hands and means of Donogh Maguire of the barony of Magheristephany in the county of Fermanagh and Rory McMaghan of Ballinagaraghan in the barony of Dartry and county of "Monoghan", and several others with them of <!-- Unreadable Word --> counties.

And further this deponent saith that the said Donogh Maguire came to the deponent's house at the Carrow in Fermanagh about the later end of October 1641 and with him about 20 foot and horse about night falling and after him came Rory McMaghan who sitting at the table, the said Donogh Maguire said that he did not know of the plot and was not acquainted (?) with it and said that he had a pretty competent estate and might live well on it, and could wish it had never been begun, but seeing he was now entered into it with the rest he would not give over but fight it out unto the last man. And as the deponent remembreth also said that if there were any violence or hurt offered to my Lord of "Eneskilling" that there would many others pay for it.

And after supper the said Rory Maguire and Donogh McMaghan and Hugh McMaghan called the deponent into his bed chamber and there was with him one Patrick O'Birne and the said Donogh asked him what money or gold he had, or could fetch him. He told him he had not much but had some, but he could not expect much money from him in regard he had been a dweller there but a short time as they themselves did know and found it a naked place, and laid out at least £400 or £500 in building fencing and planting, and besides he kept in his own hands and under his own stock within the counties of "Monoghan" and Fermanagh about 15 tates of land which would contain a good stock, which stock they of both counties had amongst them and by these occasions they could not expect much moneys from him. But the said Donogh did put him to his oath what money or gold he could fetch him. The deponent told him he had a matter of £200 and upwards where at he grew very angry and said he did not care for it at all but swore he must get him more or he would make the best bone in his body pay for it, or to that effect. The deponent seeing him so angry and being afraid he would take his life told him of some gold above £300 that was hidden in a water pump and promised to show it him the next morning which he did. And thinketh as he "Verely beleeveth" that they had of him hard upon £600 but directly how much he cannot tell. And the next morning the said Donogh and Rory went away with their followers only there was some left in the house to keep the deponent and his family, and that morning they and their followers carried away some of this deponent's horses and other things but directly what they were he knoweth not. Also that night they did put up some plate linen and apparel and some other of the choioest things such as they best liked into some chests, locked them up and took with them the keys but what things they took directly he knoweth not for he was not present. And about a day after or two the said Rory sent some people in the night to fetch them what he or they liked. And about some six or seven weeks after the said Donogh and his wife and children came to the deponent's house to the Carrow and there dwelled where the deponent and his wife left all their household stuff, bedding and furniture, and all the rest of the things belonging to the house and which was in the house but only what was formerly stolen and taken away by the people that went "too and froe". And also all the corn in "hagard" and stock on the land that was not formerly stolen or taken away.

Afterwards the said Donogh gave the deponent his wife and company a "passe" and leave to come away but being on their journey as far as Virginia being about 20 miles there followed them 4 men on horseback with "swordes pistolls and darts". Two of them were the said Donogh's own servants as he thinketh called Patrick Plunkett and Oliver Plunckett, Ever McRory McMaghan of Dartry in the county of "Monoghan" and one Nicholas Fitzsimmons, and showed them a warrant from Donogh Maguire under his hand to carry them back again and took the deponent's pass from him and "brake it" and stayed them there at Virginia and thereabouts about 3 days and 3 nights where he were most miserably abused by the Relyes and others. And the said Patrick Plunckett "gott" of the deponent's wife £4 in gold and a signet of him worth 45s., and as he remembreth about 10s. or 12s. in silver and afterwards they went their ways and left them in the hands of the Relyes.

'In Virginia they had their horses and clothes taken from them and that little gold and moneys they had left by some of the Relies and others that he knew not; and there was one that was called Captain amongst them whose name (as the deponent heard) was Cahir O'Rely (a great cruel wicked rogue) who "seuerall tymes" threatened to take away the deponent's life and several others with him did the like, who offered them also much violence.

And there was one Phillip Rely a young man with them who showed the deponent "a faire hanger" and told him it was taken from Mr. Aldrich when he was "stript" about Laghrammer.

When the deponent and his company came to Kells they were very ill used and had some things which they had left taken from them. At length they came to one Thomas Barnwell's house where they continued lying in a hay loft about 3 days and 3 nights. There the deponent's wife, daughter and kinswoman were stripped stark naked, and himself was like to be "murthered" by one Ferdorogh O'Dawly and two or three more whose names he knew not. And Mr. Barnwell was afraid he should be robbed, or his house burned for keeping English in his house, and the deponent was forced to fly out of the house in the night into the backside of the town for safety of his life where he lay a long time to hide himself from the "roagues" and he was told that they searched several houses in the town for him to have killed him, but found him not.

And after coming through the town of Ratowth they, this deponent and his company met with about 100 or 200 of men or rebels who took from him his "cloake" and some other things that were his "wiffs" and three horses that were lent them but after much trouble the horses were gotten again and these men or rebels were some of them under Captain Darcies command as it was said and of some other. And there they had like to have been killed had not a gentleman one Mr. Andrew Barnwell and Robert Burford and the "Portreffes" wife Mrs. Kerdiff (who took great care and pains to save them from their cruelties for otherwise he thinketh they had been killed or spoiled by them).

There is one Sourlock of Sourlockstowne near Trim who by the general report that he heard of him was a very bloody man and that he and his people did much hurt to the English people on their way.

Con oge McMaghan [in the beginning of the said rebellion] said that all the country in Ireland were in action of rebellion as well as "Monoghan" and Fermanagh and that there was [ ] in England and Scotland [ ] between the papists and the protestants.

And moreover he said that the Irish were most certainly informed that there was a course to be suddenly taken with them to make them go to Church or else to "loose their liues" and that they had seen some writings or letter to that effect. And said that Owen McArt O'Neill was "comen" out of Spain and landed about Strangford, or on that side, and that he had brought store of arms and men with him and that there were many "Redshancks comen" over out of the high lands in Scotland to take their parts.

And the said Con did confess that he was in Dublin in company with my Lord of "Eniskilling" and Hugh oge McMaghan, and when they were apprehended, he got away by stealth into the "cuntry" again.

And the deponent heard it credibly reported that there were many English and Scottish killed and put to "dath" [?] in Clownesse and near thereabouts and how many he knoweth not.

And this deponent further saith in and on the behalf of the Rt. Hon. Nicholas Lord Baron of Howth that by reason of this present rebellion his Lordship is dispoiled and hindered of the rents following payable to his Lordship out of the counties of "Monoghan and Tirone" vizt one least of several lands which his Lordship had within the foresaid counties wherein he had about 56 years to come, which was worth and "yeelded" him 697 pounds or thereabouts as he doth believe and remembreth out of which he paid per annum [ ].

Also there was owing to the said Lord of Hewith for arrears of rent some due by bill bond and otherwise together with this whole year's rent due at May next or before which amounts onto 548 pounds 10 shillings in all 1,245 pounds 10 shillings.

Sworn 23 February 1641 before Henry Jones and William Hitchcock. [Examined]

13. Lawrence Knowles of the parish of Newtowne in the county of Fermanagh gent sworn and examined saith that on or about the 23rd of October 1641 this deponent with his wife and five children fled (amongst many other protestants for safety of their lives) into the church of Newtowne where they stayed 2 days and then Rory Maguire of Hassettown with his rebellious crew burning that town, forced them out of the church and stripped them all naked, they the protestants being about "nynscore" persons but they were suffered to go away with their lives howbeit divers that when out of the company were "murthered" by the rebels.

And this deponent further saith that he was credibly told by divers that saw the same that after the rebels had taken the said church they took an English child, whose father and mother lay sick in the same church and boiled it in a "caldron of hott water over the fyer in the same church". The "caldron" was taken either from this deponent's brother Thomas Knowles or from one Mountford's.

He further saith that one Mr Thomas Lane being stripped in the churchyard and thinking he should be starved with cold, desired he might there end his life by fighting the six of the said Rory Maguire's best men. The said Rory consenting, a quarter "staffe" was delivered into his hands where with (although he was a very ancient man) he first fought with six of them and struck some of them. The rest seeing him so resolute and "belije" [?] fearing he should overcome those six set [att] upon him by far greater numbers and so then and there most barbarously slew him.

And the deponent further saith that by occasion of the same rebellion he hath "bin" and is deprived and dispoiled of goods leases and "chattels" worth £500 and expelled from his "freehould" worth 7 pounds per annum and that he with his wife and 5 children were stripped naked and so famished that all his children died.

[Signed] Lawrence Knowles

Sworn 7 January 1641 before Henry Jones and John Sterne

And the deponent Lawrence Knowles farther saith that Richard Ford late of Clancorrin in the county of "Monoghan" gent in the beginning of the present rebellion and by occasion thereof was robbed and deprived of goods worth 400 pounds and deprived and driven from three poles of land worth 50 pounds per annum [signed] Lawrence Knowles.

14. John Simpson the son of Thomas Simpson late of Clonelte [in the parish of Drumully half barony of Coole] and county of Fermanagh gent sworn [and examined] saith that he and Francis Simpson his brother being protestants and dwelling all together with the said Thomas and his wife, their said father and mother, they the said Thomas and his wife repaired into England and the said Francis being pressed as a "soulder" to serve under the command of Captain Aldrich went towards Tredarth with the 600 soldiers where he was slain. But the deponent himself with 2 of his sisters [is] are now in Dublin, and one other sister is in restraint amongst the rebels. But he this deponent deposeth that his said father in the beginning of the present rebellion was robbed of and lost in cattle 10 pounds, in cord 9 pounds, in household goods and other provision 5 pounds, in debts 35 pounds whereof 7 pounds was due from one Robert McDonnell and one Teige McDermott of the Feugh in the same parish and county, who are both in actual rebellion and 6 pounds was due from one Hugh McPatrick McHugh McDonnell's of Clowinston in the county of "Monoghan" a freeholder, who is likewise an actor in the same [?] rebellion. In all amounting to 54 pounds sterling.

We likewise deposeth that his said brother Francis the same time was robbed of his goods and lost [in a lease worth 26 pounds in cattle 26 pounds corn in the haggard and hay worth 10 pounds, corn "sowen" worth 20 pounds in debts 12 [?] pounds in household and other provision 5 pounds 10 shillings all amounting to 100 pounds sterling].

Likewise this deponent saith that he his deponent was then also robbed of his goods [and lost one [?] lease worth 26 pounds in cattle worth 34 pounds in corn in the haygard and [ ] hay worth 8 pounds, corn growing worth 20 pounds household goods and other provision worth 6 pounds in debts 18 pounds whereof 5 pounds was due from one Shane McCollo McDonell of Clanfadda [?] in the county of "Monoghan" freehold [?] who [ ] in rebellion and 4 pounds from one Ambrose Carlton who is in rebellion also in all amounting to 112 pounds sterling] by the means of the said Shane McCollo McDonnell, Hugh McPatrick McHugh McDonnell, Collo McOwen McCollo McDonnell, all of the county of "Monoghan" in the parish of Dartry, with their partakers to the number of 20 or more, who were in rebellion and did go with one Captain Rory Maguire of "Hassetstowne" in the barony of "Lurge" and county of Fermanagh and Donogher Maguire Esq uncle to the Lord Maguire with others being in rebellion as this deponent doth "verely beleeve" to the number of 300 against "Eneskillin" to take it. And this deponent going to the forenamed Ambrose Carlton who is a scotchman and married with Sir Nicholas White's sister, to seek for some succour, and continuing there with them for some 5 months, during all that time the said Ambrose did entertain the said Rory Maguire and all his company with meat and drink so that they the said Ambrose and his family were fearful of being killed or wanting provision themselves and hearing they were quiet in the Pale they required Brian McCohonate Maguire to help them to a convey [?] to bring them to Sir Nicholas White's whereupon the said Brian with his company came with the said Ambrose Carlton and with 4 English and 4 Scotchmen within a mile of "Clunes" and leaving 4 of his men there with them, the Lord of Killeene and the Lord Dunsanies eldest son took them all prisoners and disarmed the said Brian Maguire's men, told them that they should all behind, and tied them to "Dewleeke" where they intend[ed] to have hanged them but the said Brian thinking his men [ ] lost sent his footman to look for them who found them ready to be put to death and returned speedily to his master and told him of their danger, who came very speedily, "releeved" them and made some of them passes to go to Dublin. Notwithstanding th[ey] went not far before they were put to death, all but this deponent and one more who did refer to our army when they went [ ] to Athy, so to the Naas, and from thence came to this "cittie".

And further this deponent saith that the said Brian McCohonate Maguire was very favourable to the English and Captain Atkinson and his wife being prisoners with the rebels he the said Brian Maguire did set them at liberty and brought them to "Eneskillin".

And further saith that the rebels told him this deponent that in the castle of Lisgoole there were burnt seven score and twelve men women and children which they effected by loading several carts with straw and placing the same "closse" round about the castle as high as th[ ] which being set on fire smothered and burned all the parties aforesaid which fire this deponent saw a "farr off".

Sworn 16 May 1642 before William Aldrich and William Hitchcock. [Examined]

15. Thomas Walker of Bunn [in the parish of Drumully barony of Coole] county of Fermanagh yeoman [age 46 years or thereabouts being duly sworn] deposeth that he was robbed and dispoiled of all his goods at Bunn aforesaid the 23"th" day of October last about 2 "howres" within night [being of the several values following in corn worth 16 pounds in hay worth 40 shillings in cattle worth 26 pounds in household goods provision for the house and other goods worth 10 pounds one lease of half the tate of land of Bunn aforesaid being part and parcel of the manor of Castlecoole for 28 years from the first day of May last at and under the yearly rent of 57 shillings worth 10 pounds per annum, whereof one year's profit is already lost in all amounting to the sum of 64 pounds besides the future profits from henceforth until a peace be settled] by Thomas Maguire of Killelahard in the said parish gent: Nicholas Brady of the same yeoman and divers other Irish rebels to the number of 60 or thereabouts being of the company of Rory Maguire.

And further deposeth that he heard by Patrick McDonaghee late servant to Robert Walker this deponent's brother that one Patrick McDonoghee of Cornebrean in the said parish and cousin to the late servant of Robert Walker did with a rapier"murther" Richard Butler and a child that he carried upon his back. They said Butler being Miller to Charles Waterhowse of Castlewaterhowse Esq at his "milne" within the "proporcon" of Deriana, and that he this deponent his wife and 4 children were all stripped in the way betwixt the Bull and Virginia in the county of Cavan the 3rd day of November last and left naked by some of the rebels of the company of Phillip McHugh McShane O'Rely Esq. Their names he knoweth not. And this deponent desiring them rather to take away his life than use him so, they said they would not meddle with his life but there were 10,000 upon Dublin green that would do it. And further saith that some of the rebels "publiquely" said they hoped to make the Lord Maguire their king and that they were sure he had taken Dublin castle, or else their case were worse "then" the English. And when this deponent and the rest of the English prisoners desired the rebels rather to kill them as they did others "then to kepe" them in that misery they answered that the Lord Maguire had 10,000 men on Dublin "greene" which would either kill the deponent and the rest of the English protestants or drive them into the sea or [words] to that effect.

Sworn 2nd June 1642 before Henry Brereton and Ran[ ] Adams. [Examined]

16. Thomas Leisance of Mackan in the county of Fermanagh in the barony of Clonually yeomen [aged 24 years or thereabouts being duly] sworn and examined saith that on the 23"th" day of October 1641 he was robbed and stripped by one Redmond oge McKeawly gen[t] Morris Ballagh McCassedie Flaerteragh McHugh gent Fleartagh Maguire gent Phelim Maguire gent and divers others of the parish of Clonually in the county aforesaid (they being all followers and belonging to Captain Rory Maguire) of goods and means worth 208 pounds [of the goods "chattells" and things following vizt of the possession and profits of a great tate of land called Macken in the barony of Clownally which he had in lease for 21 years worth 10 pounds sterling, 30 pounds in ready money 4 cows and young cattle 4 horses mares and colts corn hay household goods 4 "tubbs" a buffer all which amounts onto 208 pounds sterling].

And further saith that upon "Tewsday" next after the day above written Charles Leisance father to this deponent with Mr Francis Silliard John Cravan the father and John Cravan his son, as they were "comeing" from their own houses towards Dublin a little on this side "Clonualley" church were assaulted and set upon by Daniell McManus and Patrick oge McManus Fleartagh McHugh and Fleartagh Maguire Patrick O'Lagan Brian O'Rely Patrick O'Douenan [?] Patrick O'Flanagan Brian McMurrogh Farrell Magey [?] Cahell oge Philip McManus Edmund McManus Daniell Magawran Gillernew Macawran Thomas Purcell Teige O'Connor [?] Patrick O'Connor Hugh Magey Shane Keyernan Cormick Reagh McMorrogh, all farmers of the parish of Clownally all rebels who then and there "murthered" them most "wofully" with swords and "skeines" called them English "doggs" <!-- Unreadable Word --> told them that they should go no further to carry "newes" into England. And this deponent had his "arme" almost "cutt asunder".

Sworn 13th June 1642 before John Sterne and William Hitchcock.

17. Simon Crane of Knockanaragan in the county of Fermanagh [being duly sworn] deposeth and saith [that about the 26th of October last 1641 he was robbed of his [ ] lawfully possessed of the goods "chattells" leases and estates following vizt of cows oxen and steeres [?] to the number of 260 or more and 20 calves or more of English breed worth in all 520 pounds; about 30 horses mares and colts worth 60 pounds; about 18 hoggs and swyne worth 14 pounds corn worth 9 pounds hay and s ing worth 20 pounds plate ready money jewels "howshold" and other "vtensills" to the value of 150 pounds wearing "apparell" and other "habillments" [?] to the value of 50 pounds, debts due and owing onto him about 450 pounds of lands and leases of the "clere yerely" value of 40 pounds per annum for 60 years whereof he is like to [ ] lose [?] the future profits until a peace be had and that he being thereof possessed] that about the 26th day of October last 1641 he was robbed spoiled and "beceaved" [?] of his goods and "chattells" by Donogh Maguire Esq Hugh McMaghan gent Thomas O'Hultaghan "preist" and many others by them employed whose names he now remembreth not, and that he hath ever since been kept from them and deprived of all the same which are so lost or in hazard to be lost.

And further saith that he had heard the rebels commonly say that they would "roote" all the English and Scottish out of this kingdom. And he heard that they have comitted divers "murthers" vizt upon Arthur Champin Esq Thomas Digginson John Mains [?] Edward Powlet and Cleazer [?] Middleton whom he heard they persuaded to turn papist and presently after hanged him. And he also heard that they burned the castles of Lisgoole and Tully with divers men women and children within and that they comitted many sacriligious acts by burning of churches vizt the churches of "Monoghan Clownes and Newtowne", and also many bibles and other books of divinity vizt the Bishop of Clogher's library Mr Mooses [?] Mr Sings [?] and Mr Hudson's libraries.

He knoweth these persons following to be in actual rebellion vizt Rory Maguire Donogh Maguire Esq Hugh McBrian McCohannaght [?] Maguire Thomas oge Maguire Don Carragh Maguire Patrick oge McCollo McDonnell Edmund Roe McDonnell Thomas oge Maguire Thurlogh McTho[mas] Boy Maguire Patrick McTho[mas] Boy Maguire Rosse McPatrick Maguire, Edmund Carragh Maguire, Hugh McMahan, Tho[mas] O'Haltaghan with divers others of meaner quality. And saith that by means of the rebellion he is deprived of and hath lost the perquisites and profits of his office of Regist[rar] of the diocese of Clogher which he was to hold by patent for his life worth co[mmun?] ibus annis 100 pounds per annum.

Sworn 9 August 1641 before William Aldrich Henry Brerton and John Sterne. [Examined]

18. Robert Flack of Mulloghmore in the county of Fermanagh gent son and heir to Robert Flack late of the same clerk deceased and brother and heir to Thomas Flack of the same clerk deceased, and also brother and heir to Phillip Flack late of Drumcollogh in the foresaid county gent deceased (all three of them being "murthered" by the rebels) being duly sworn deposeth and saith that the said Robert Flack his father and Thomas and Phillip his said brothers and himself the first said Robert Flack were the 23"th" day of October 1641 and since severally and respectively [robbed of their estates worth 3,384 pounds]* [possessed of divers lands tenements goods and "chattells", the particulars wherefore to the best of the deponents remembrance are as followeth: cows cattle oxen and "heffers" to the number of 300 worth 500 pounds, horses mares and colts to the number of 24 well worth 800 pounds English sheep 20 well worth 60 pounds corn well worth 260 pounds hay worth 60 pounds 20 "hogges and swyne" worth 6 pounds, jewels plate ready money household stuff and apparel worth 600 pounds debts upon bonds bulls and arrears of rents that were then due the sum of 230 pounds, in leasehold lands of the "clere yerely" rent of 8 pounds which is like to be lost until peace be settled 8 pounds per annum; and that they were seized of freehold lands of inheritance of the clear yearly rent of 60 pounds whereon there was built one fair house or castle which cost in the building 600 pounds, and of the rents and profits of the church or rectory of Maghereculmonie which were worth yearly 200 pounds which is like to be lost until a peace be settled, the whole losses amounting to 3,384.

And further saith that they the forenamed persons being of the said particulars "seuerally" and respectively so seized and possessed about the time aforesaid and since were thereof and of every part thereof expelled dispoiled and deprived] by the rebel Rory Maguire Hugh McAdeganny Maguire "preist" Laughlin McCabe, Tirlogh McCabe Rory McCabe, Tirlogh Maguire Owen McCabe, Donogh oge McATeggart Coohunnaght of the parish of "Magherycullmmy" aforesaid and divers others whose names this deponent remembreth not, who forceible" possessed themselves of all and every the foresaid particulars lands goods and chattels, and have and still do hold them from this deponent being right heir and proprietor thereof so as the deponent now hath absolutely lost them.

And further deposeth that he hath often times heard some of the rebellious person say that they would never submit themselves nor stand to his majesty's mercy, nor would ever leave their courses, so long as there was either English or Scotchman alive in this kingdom except some "artaficers" whom they would keep as "slaues" to work for them. And that they would never have any other than Irish officers and magistrates to rule over them.

And further saith that he knoweth these "ensueing" persons to be in actual rebellion vizt Hugh Boy McBrian, Carragh Maguire, Donogh oge Maguire, Thomas Maguire, James Sollagh Maguire, Patrick Maguire, Edm[und?] O'Sleveen, Donogh O'Monoghan Phelim oge O'Monoghan, James O'Monoghan, Patrick Magragh, Patrick McCragh McChoen, Cahell McChoen of the parish aforesaid, Redmund Maguire, Collogh Maguire Hugh Boy McSturne [?] oge Maguire, Owen Ballagh McLeisher, Donogh O'Durnyne [?] and Redmund O'Durnin, James Ballagh Maguire, Edward O'Monoghan, all of the same parish and divers other whose names he cannot remembreth.

And further saith that Robert Forest [?], Thomas Slate, John Bell, William Bell and his son and six more protestants were within the parish of "Maghereculmony" aforesaid "murthered" at 2 several times by the rebels and 3 more protestants were hanged at several times by Hugh McAdegany Maguire aforenamed a "preist", who also "cawsed" many others at other times to be hanged, and would tell the rebels that he would pardon and forgive" them for killing "heretiques", meaning the protestants calling them English "doggs" and by some of the McCabes, Maguires and the Monoghans. And many other men women and children were by the rebels cruelly "murthered" within that parish whose names he cannot remember. And further saith that the rebels within the county of Fermanagh did also "murther" and put to death at Lotherstoune (as this deponent hath "bin" credibly informed by Nicholas Edwards of the parish of "Maghereculmony" aforesaid) 26 men women and children protestants at one time. And that they also "murthered" at Lisgoole in the county of Fermanagh about 50 men women and children. And that the rebels also "murthered" of the protestants within the several towns of "Castletully"and"Maghereboy" within the county of Fermanagh at least "fowrscore" and burned and spoiled all the protestant books they could find in the county of Fermanagh worth 1,000 pounds at least whereof so many as were worth 100 pounds were this deponent's own father's books.

Sworn 12 August 1641 before John Sterne and William Aldrich. [Examined]

19. Katherin Madieson the relict of Peter Madieson late of Ramnahan [in the parish of Drumully] in the county of Fermanagh ("murthered" by the rebels) [being duly sworn and examined] deposeth [and saith] that since the beginning of the present rebellion vizt on or about the 23d October 1641 her late husband and she were expelled deprived robbed [or otherwise dispoiled of their goods and chattels] of the value hereafter expressed vizt of corn in the "hagard" and in the ground worth 72 pounds, household stuff worth 20 pounds, cattle, horses, mares and sheep worth 30 pounds. And they were also deprived of the benefit of their lease of Ramnahan [Raninahan?] wherein they dwelt, for their interest wherein they were proffered 50 pounds. And they were likewise deprived of one year's benefit of a lease of half a tite of land called Cloneseale worth 6 pounds per annum vlt[ ] repris[?] and are like to lose the future profits thereof (worth 6 pounds per annum as aforesaid) until a peace be settled].

And further saith that the parties rebels that so robbed them as aforesaid are as followeth vizt Farrell McCaffrie of Kilturk in the county of Fermanagh husbandman "Rauell" McDonell of the parish of Drumully aforesaid husbandman, Redmond Maguire of Shralistran in the said county husbandman, with divers others their "complicees and confederats" whose names and "placs of aboad" this deponent doth know.

And this deponent further saith that the rebels having deadly wounded her husband, and leaving him for dead, departed from him, but after returned and "perceiving him to "stirr" they hacked and mangled his body in a most barbarous inhumane manner". And notwithstanding they had thus used him, they would not beleeve he was dead, but a fortnight after "cawsed his graue to be digged" to see whether he were dead or "nod, and cawsed the corps to ly vncouered till some of the murtherers came to behold him".

And further saith that about "Midsommer" last the rebels hanged William Betty Davy McKey a "Scottchman" Thomas Michell, Samuell Greame John Grigg all of the parish of Drumully aforesaid, as also William Seaton and Joseph Crosse near "Shanoge" [?] in the said county some whereof (being very sick of "feavers") were taken out of their beds and hanged.

And further saith that the rebels upon a Saturday at night in "lent" last drove before them all women and children the number of 16, some of the children being a quarter old, some 3 years old, some 4 years, some more, some less, and round them in a bogpit, and as they endeavoured to come forth of the pit to save their lives the rebels knocked them in the heads with poles, and the same night that the same women and children were drowned the rebels "murthered" one Mr Bingham.

And further saith that she hath credibly heard that the rebels compelled divers protestants to the number of 70 persons to go to the river of Belturbett and then threw them over the bridge into the water and drowned them. And further saith that she hath often heard some of the rebels say that the "preists and friers" were the first "cawsers" of this insurrection and rebellion and another called thereof was because the Queens Confessor was "murthered" in her arms and that it was a common voice amongst them the year before to say God save the King and now God save the Queen.

And further saith that she hath heard it very credibly reported that the rebels also but "murthered" Mary the wife of Humphrey Price and Jane Price her daughter as also the said Humphrey Price himself.

And further saith that the rebels often threatened her, this deponent, to kill her "vnles" she would go to "masse" and do as they did. And that it was a common thing for the rebels to say that the old English of the Pale (who though they joined with them in this rebellion) deserved to be hanged as well as the other English. And saith further that she hath often heard the rebels say that they would drive all the English and Scotch out of this kingdom and that both man woman and child that had a "dropp" of English or Scottish blood in them they would "cutt off and vtterly destroy".

They said also that all that went to the church went to the "divell" for God had nothing to do with them nor they with him.

And further saith that one Robert Goate a Scotchman was also most cruelly hanged, and made away by the rebels.

Sworn 17 November 1642 before John Watson, Ran[dolph] Adams Henry Brerton and William Aldrich. [Examined]

20. Margery Barlowe the reliot of Anthony Barlowe late of Newtowne in the county of Fermanagh farmer sworn and examined saith that [in and] since the beginning of the present rebellion vizt about the 23"th" or 24th of October 1641 the said Anthony Barlowe and she were deprived and robbed [or otherwise dispoiled] of their means goods and chattels [worth 300 pounds] [consisting of beasts horses household stuff corn hay and their interest of two leases all worth above 300 pounds sterling] by the rebels Rory Maguire "Colonell" brother to the lord Maguire "Don" Caro W Maguire captain of rebels, Turlogh McThomas Boy, Tho[mas] oge Maguire of Bowhasset in the county of Fermanagh aforesaid gent, Turlogh Ballogh of Bowhassett aforesaid gent, a most bloody "murtherer" who together with divers other rebels in the beginning of "lent" 1641 hanged this deponent's husband before her face, and also hanged one John Moore John Hutchingson Gabriell Gibson Mathew Holsworth [?] Thomas Thrower William Seaton (all at one time) and the divers others (all protestants) which they put to death at several other times.

And the rebels stripped stark naked heard this deponent and 6 children and so turned them out a begging in frost and snow by means whereof they were almost all "starued" to death, they having nothing else to eat in 3 weeks but only two old hard puckins or "calfe skinns" (one or two yeres before kild) which they "bett into smalle peecs with stones and soe for meere hunger heat it with the haire and all". In so much as her poor near starved children cried unto her to go out, and rather be killed "abroad then lye in a hoale to be starued" and the rebels "haveing gotten a great ouerthrow one tyme did after levie another force and said that then [?] they would haue Eniskillin whether god would or nod".

Sworn 27 February 1642 before Ran[dolph] Adams William Aldrich. [Examined]

21. John Ligh, late of Bowbrane in the county of Fermanagh gent Senescall to the Right Honourable Fardnando Lord Hastings [sworn and examined] deposeth [and saith] that in the beginning of the rebellion vizt about the 23"th" of October 1641 he the deponent at Bowbrane aforesaid and in other places within the county afordsaid was deprived and robbed [or otherwise dispoiled] of his means goods and chattels [worth 1,200 pounds sterling] [vizt cattle horses mares corn hay household stuff plate jewels ready money and other his estate all being of the value of 1,200 pounds] by, and by the means (as this deponent was informed by his own wife) of his neere" neighbours vizt Oghy O'Hossey Neise O'Hossey, Flaertie McCue Brian McCue, Turlogh McCue Patrick McBaran, Cormcoge McMurrey (an old wood "jerne") Turlogh Patrick Brian and James Magraith, Rory Maguire [a] "Colonell" of rebels, Donogh Maguire Hugh Maguire and Edm[un]d oge McDeane Maguire gent, all of the county of Fermanagh and divers other rebels whose names he knoweth not, because he suddenly fled away to save his life, but after he was robbed he was "soe as aforesaid bereft" of all his goods and had his wife stripped of her clothes.

And further saith that soon after Sir William Cole Knight sent 16 "musketteers" and about 30 "pykemen" to join with the Scotts, whereof this deponent was one that had made head against the rebels and being joined together and being in all scarcely 300, "nett the rebells in the feild" they being about 1,600 in number upon which meeting the rebels desired a parly which being granted the rebels desired the Scotts and English to withdraw their forces and forbear to fight that day vowing and swearing that I if they would forbear the fight that then they the rebels would "redelm" all the goods which they had taken either from English or Scotts which the English and Scotts believing and being sensible of the great number of the rebels and how few they were themselves imbrazed" that offered peace and departed away but when they were gone those perfidious rebels instead of restitution of those goods fell upon the rest of the English and Scotts and robbed and stript them as fast as they could, and notld not restore anything back at all.

And further saith that Charles Seagraue late of Lisgowle in the county aforesaid esquire late agent for the right honourable Pardnando Lord Hastings, was the said 23"th" of October 1641 also by the [?] rebels deprived robbed or otherwise dispoiled of his means and chattels vizt beasts cattle horses mares sheep corn hay money household stuff provision "apparrell" and other his estate with in all "fowre thowsand pownds" or thereabouts. And although the said Mr Seagrave fled away and so escaped with his life yet he taking and harbouring too much "greef" died about March then next after, and quickly after his wife died leaving behind them 2 children both which were sent into England.

And further saith that Ann Adlin [?] widow sister of the said Charles Seagrave at the time aforesaid was also by the rebels deprived and robbed of her means goods and chattels was 700 pounds or thereabouts, and "takeing ouermuch greefe" for the same and the dispoiling of her "friends" she therewith also died about the said "moneth" of March 1641.

Sworn 7 March 1642 before William Aldrich and Henry Brereton. [Examined]

22. Captain Roger Atkinson of Castle Atkinson in the barony of Coole and "Terkennedy" in the county of Fermanagh being sworn and examined deposeth [?] [and saith] that the 23"th" day of October 1641 he was [deprived of his estate worth] [possessed of and was constrained to forsake and depart from Castle Atkinson aforesaid for "safegard" of his life so as thereby he left the possession as well of all his lands of inheritance as lease lands and by means of this present rebellion [ ] deprived of the several goods and particulars hereunder mentioned by the Irish rebels within the said county as followeth vizt his charge of building of his Castle and houses planting and enclosure of his gardens and grounds the sum of 1,700 pounds; his cattle household stuff and other goods worth the sum of 1,008 pounds 11 shillings and sixpence; in lease lands at the rent of 30 pounds per annum worth the sum of 210 pounds. The sum total: 2,918 pounds. Besides free [hold?] lands for the several lives of the said Captain Roger Atkinson and Edith his wife yielding the yearly rent of 230 pounds and he further saith that Captain Rory Maguire Donogh Maguire Chohonagh Maguire Hugh Maguire Neise O'Hossey and Oghy O'Hosaey Donogh Maoaffery Phelim O'Cassidy and his sons and the sept of the O'Flanegans as this examinant hath heard were all out in actual rebellion together with Flatertagh MoHugh, Brian McHugh, and divers others at the time aforesaid. And further saith (as he credibly heard) that the Irish rebels did set fire on the Castle of Lisgoole so that many protestants seeking to escape out of the said Castle were burned and cruelly "Murthered".

And likewise saith that he heard that divers protestants who had a while defended the Castle of Tully belonging to Sir George Hume after yielbed [it] upon quarter whereupon the rebels contrary to their promise to them, did presently murther and kill them all (save only the Lady Hume). And he hath heard that the rebels killed and murdered divers persons at Lowtherstoune as namely Mr Flacke "Clark" and his wife, Garrard Redmond and his wife with many others whose names he romembreth not.

Sworn 26th June 1643 before William Aldrich Jo[hn] Watson Henry Brereton and John Sterne. [Examined]

23. Ann the reliot of Francis Blenerhassett late of Hassetsfort in the county of Fermanagh esquire sworn and examined salth that in the "beginning of the rebellion vizt the 23"th" of October 1641 her said husband and "shee" and her children were by force and arms [deprived of their estate worth] [expelled and driven from their lands castles houses and farms and dispoiled of their clothes and "apparell"; and then also he the said Francis Blenerhassett and this deponent were "forceably" robbed deprived or otherwise dispoiled of their beasts cattle sheep horses corn ready money, charges of buildings improvements of land farms, and an iron work, "apparrell" household goods and other things in the acuities of Fermanagh aforesaid, Cavan and "Monoghan"; and that she her husband and children have lost the profits of their lands farms and iron works ever since in all of the value and to the damage of and loss] of 1,860 pounds sterling [besides their future estate in lands]

[And that she his deponent and her husband and eldest son and her children (her husband being now dead) are like to be deprived of and lose the future profits of their land and farms worth 320 pounds per annum until a peace be established].

And saith that the rebels which so expelled deprived robbed and dispoiled them were Rory Maguire brother to the Lord Maguire, Hugh Buy Maguire now or late of Hovreland [?] esquire Collo Maguire gent and their "souldyers complicees and rebellious partakers" whose names she cannot express which said Hugh Buy Maguire afterwards told this deponent that he had sent 40 men to kill this deponent's said husband. Howbeit god so provided that her husband by flight escaped their hands that time. Howbeit afterwards as this deponent hath "bin" credibly told and "beleeveth" the rebels at Lotherstoune in the said county of Fermanagh, most barbarously and cruelly hanged up to dead on "Tenterhooks" Tho[mas] Redman the deponent's son-in-law, and afterwards many tortures used to his wife to confess monies, at length murdered her and her children also and robbed stripped and dispoiled also him the said Thomas Redman and his wife of a personal estate worth 500 pounds at least.

And further saith that for seven weeks after the rebellion began she this deponent was kept in hold in the said Rory Maguire's house from whence he then sent her to her husband to Ballashannon Castle in the county of "Donagall" where her husband was shot by the rebels and afterwards died, and there she and his and her children stayed for a year and a half together, and in that time endured much want and misery and at length she and five of her children and divers other protestants were brought thence by shipping [towards] Dublin bringing "noe meanes nor releef with them" in so much as she and those in the ship being long at sea, and wanting victuals at sea and being ready to famish, some of them resolved to go on [ ] and adventure amongst the rebels rather than starve. Howbeit on a "suddeine" such was god's great mercy and pity of them that he discouered on to them a small little island over [against] the port or part of Casledoe, unto which the mariners "veering" and bringing that ship, they landed and found there 9 cows 40 sheep and some hens and barley wherewith they [very] well victualled themselves and so were well and safely preserved and restored [?] [opposing them].

And further saith that she hath credibly heard some of the rebellious "souldyers" at the said Rory Maguires house "bragg boast and say that they had hanged several protestant men in the churchyard of that parish where Mr Flack was minister [three] of which protestants names were of the Bells. And this deponent hath credibly heard and is confident the report is true that the said Rory Maguire sent the said Mr Flack and his wife and his wife's brother and their children and other protestants to the number of 21 with a "convay" by water towards Ballyshannon who after they were landed and "comen" a very little way out of the county of Fermanagh, the same "convoy" seemed to leave than and quickly thereup other rebels or the "convoy" themselves fell upon and murdered them all (as some of the convoy promised [?] or threatened should be done the night before.

Sworn 31st July 1643 before William Aldrich [ ] Pigott and John Watson. [Examined]

24. George Ardwiok [?] of Aghaleine in the county of Fermanagh esquire [sworn and examined] deposeth [and saith] that since the beginning of the present rebellion that is to say about the 1st of November 1641 he this deponent at "Agheleine" aforesaid was forceably [expelled] deprived and dispoiled of the possession rents and profits of his lands [and goods worth 317 pounds] [wherein he had an estate for his life worth 40 pounds per annum, whereof two years profits etc now lost; and also of his household stuff horses cows apparel money books and other goods in all of the value of and to his loss and damage of 317 pounds [?] sterling and that he is like to be deprived of and lose the future profits of his lands worth 40 pounds per annum as aforesaid until a peace be established if he so [ ]] by the rebels in the county of Fermanagh.

And saith that the rebels in that county hanged up to death one John Ogie [?] Tanner an English protestant, but spared the deponent's life because (as they said) he was so very old.

And further saith that about January next after the rebellion there were hanged at the Lord Maguire's bridge in Fermanagh one John Fairbour and his 3 sons and their wives and children at about the same time there was hanged one Gilbert Panoe [?] and 3 more with him and 220 cows were taken from them (though-they had and showed Captain Rory Maguire protections) which murders and outrages were committed by the rebels.

Sworn 4th August 1643 before Ed[ ] Pigott and Henry Brereton. [Examined]

25. Richard Bourk of "Eniskillin" in the county of Fermanagh Bachelor in Divinity, Minister of god's word, sworn and examined saith that in the beginning of the present rebellion and by means thereof he was deprived and robbed [or otherwise dispoiled] of his goods and chattels [worth 900 pounds besides other means worth 290 pounds per annum] [consisting of cattle household goods rents debts and other things of the value and to his present loss of 900 pounds sterling. And he is like to be deprived of and lose the future profits of his lands of inheritance and "Schoolelande" and means worth 290 pounds per annum] by the rebels Briann McGowran of Largye in the county of Cavan gent and by a company of rebels the servants soldiers and such as came to do the fact, out of the castle of Donnell McNomarra of Mountallon in the county of Clare esquire, and by another company of rebels commanded by Edmond Bourk Kilkournby [?] in the county of Galway esquire.

And further saith that he credibly heard and "verely beleeveth" it of the burning and killing of one hundred protestants at least which were murdered by the rebels in the castle of Tully in the county of Fermanagh and that the same was done after fair quarter promised as he heard. And that Hugh McIdegena Meguire a popish "preist" at "Lotherstowne" stood by as a commander and judge whilst 15 English protestants were hanged by "roagues by him brought thither for that purpose as he "verely beleeveth", divers of which English were persons of good estate and quality. One Hugh Nickson [a protestant] and his wife were murdered at Kinnally by some of the children of Phelim O'Cassidey and others, they said Phelim having then the goods of the said Nickson formerly put into his hands in trust.

And further saith that 280 English by credible report perished by means of the siege at the castle of Limerick and that 500 or thereabouts or more perished at Bunratty in the county of Clare with famine and want.

This deponent was likewise informed that Mr Lodge the Archdeacon of Killaloo being buried about 6 years since, his and divers other ministers bones were "d[i]gged" out of their graves (as patrons of heresies) by direction of one Melone Titulary Bishop of Killalooe.

One Robert Jones Minister and creature of god's word (whom the rebel seemed to favour and speak well of) was not admitted Christian burial after he was dead, by direction of some popish "preists", albeit some of his friends being rebels in regard of the goodness of the man, much solicited that he might have Christian burial but were denied because (as the said "hereticks" must not be buried in hallowed ground.

The "preists and friers" (as he observed generally and of his the deponent's knowledge in some instances) were great "incendiaries of cruelties", and in this deponent's healing one wishing that English protestants in Ireland were all in newfownd Land" a "preist" standing by maliciously answered that he would not wish so good land to be defyled with them.

And further saith that Ever McMaghan priest now titulary bishop of Down, and a man of note in the rebels "supreame Councell" is as the deponent hath heard and"beleeveth" a prime contriver and a violent prosecutor of this rebellious plot. And saith that most "heavy senselesse oathes" were imposed upon the protestants remaining amongst them at Limerick and elsewhere for "houlding" [?] "confedraoy" with the rebels vizt that they should swear that they were no puritans nor would any way directly or indirectly oppose their religion or the pope's supremacy, or the doctrine of the holy romane "Catholique" church which some of their own more judicious papists refuse to take and was very frequently (upon examination"[?] taken), even of their own, altered.

And saith also that [in the prosecuting [?] of the rebellion] one of the O'Brians of Thomond did read and relate in this deponents hearing several "prophecies" of St Patrick and of "Collumkill" the saint of Derry, of Berricanus another of their saints, and of Feon McWoill [?] an old Irish champion, and the deponent saw an English book printed in the "Lowe Cuntries") importing another prophecy of St Patrick in the hands of one of the rebels, all which prophecies the rebels did conceive to import the extirpation of the English and the settling of the whole kingdom on the Irish, and these prophecies are very commonly confidently and vehemently urged and justified by their priests for "vnboubted verities". And amongst the rest there is one prophecy to this effect:

Do behar cach Donaskia cur fear Ballacliach er goole Murfy ierla Thraly fear midi Re ana crue which is thus "Englished"

Att Downeskea a fight shalbee

And Dublin Citty shalbe tane

The King is viceroy at Acrue [?]

By th[e] Erle of Thraly shalbe slaine

The rebels speak much of a "dismall and fatall" blow which the English shall receive say they in a "battaile at Cassangell (which they understand to be Singeland at the south gate of Limerick) saying that that shall be a final end of the war and thenceforth the Irish alone shall enjoy the kingdom of Ireland to the end of the world. And that there is a "prophecie" amongst them of the destruction of Kilkenny to this effect, that O'Callaghans horseboy, taking the bridle off his horse in the"Cathedrall" place in Kilkenny shall there ask where was the Church of Kilkenny. There is another prophecy amongst them, that Rosse [?] shall be destroyed and left without either stick or "stake".

And this deponent further saith that he credibly heard from several people and believeth that one of the O'Kenedies (a bloody rebel) and his company murdered at the Silvermyne in the county of Tipperary 24 Englishmen after they were turned to "masse" and afterwards he drowned himself because he was not suffered to go on and exercise the like cruelty against the other English (as this deponent hath also credibly heard).

And this deponent himself hath seen divers protestant lie dead [long] after they had been murdered in several places within the county of Fermanagh by the rebels. And further saith that it was a general report amongst the rebels in divers counties of Ireland that the popish clergy beyond the seas did and would assist them with gunpowder and arms in this war which they call the holy war of the "Confedrate Catholicks".

And this deponent heard it from the "preists and friers" themselves within the kingdom of Ireland that the present war there "manteined" by and on the part of the Irish was by the popish clergy beyond sea publicly preached applauded and commended above all other wars by the title of the holy war and the Catholic war in destroying of Puritans whom they called "hereticks".

Sworn 12 July 1643 before John Watson and William Aldrich. [Examined]

26. Francis Wyne of the parish of"Clowness" and county of Fermanagh gent [sworn and examined] deposeth [and saith], that since the beginning of the present rebellion and by means thereof he hath been and still is deprived [and] robbed [of his goods and means worth 350 pounds] [and forceably dispoiled of the possession rents and profits of his farm and the improvement and value thereof and of due debts corn hay "fewell" beasts cattle horses mares "swyne" apparel household stuff "vtensills" sheep and other goods and chattels of the value and to his loss of 450 pounds [sic] sterling. And further saith that the rebels that so robbed and dispoiled him were and are these that follow vizt] by the rebels Rory McGilpatrick McRory McMaghan of the barony of Dartry in the county of "Monoghan" gent, and Redmond McRory McMaghan his uncle both captains to Hugh oge McMaghan of the same barony esquire which Hugh was at that time at Dublin with the Lord Maguire and their other "complicees" trusted and employed for taking and surprising of the castle of Dublin and by one Patrick O'Keglie [?] of Clautouerin [?] in the county of Fermanagh gent, Owin McCon McHugh McMaghan of the same barony, another rebellious captain Owen McPatrick McBrian oge McMaghan of the same barony gent which captains and the said Owen McPatrick, with their soldiers at or about the same time robbed and dispoiled also all his English neighbours in and about "Clownesse" aforesaid, stripped them naked and murdered all the English they could meet withal out of and about the same town of "Clowness", not so much as sparing those unto whom some of those captains had given protections in writing.

And this deponent heard at that time the said Owen McPatrick say that they had the king's commission to do what they did, which pretence the deponent was and is confident to be most false. And this deponent is "verely" persuaded he had "bin murthered" but that he was "rescowed " several times by one Turlogh O'Connolly a popish priest who carried him 9 miles out of the town to a private place of safety for doing whereof some of the rebels at his return would have hanged the said priest (as this deponent hath "bin" credibly informed) and saith that from that place of safety he the deponent fled to Sir James Craig's castle of Croghan in the county of Cavan where he and the other possessors of that castle were often beseiged both in the day and night by Phillip McMulmore O'Rely of [ ] near Kilmore in the said county of Cavan esquire, Edmund O'Rely of the same his elder brother, Miles McEdmund O'Rely then high sheriff of the county of Cavan, Charles McGowran of [ ] in the said county of Cavan gent and their soldiers who murdered divers of those that went out of that castle and deserted not their attempts until those of the castle necessitated by want and paying 4 pence or 6 pence for a quart of water [and eating of "doggs catts ratts weedes [?] and other despicable things"] took quarter and left the said castle.

Sworn 1st November 1643 before Henry Jones Henry Brereton. [Examined]

27. William Baker of Tullymore in the county of Fermanagh [cook aged 50 years or thereabouts sworn and examined] deposeth and saith that in the beginning of the present rebellion vizt 23"th" of October 1641 the deponent at Tullymore aforesaid was forceably deprived and robbed [and dispoiled] of his goods and chattels [worth 167 pounds] [consisting of beasts cattle geldings mares corn hay household goods debts apparel and other things amounting in all to the sum of 167 pounds sterling at the least] by the rebels Rory Maguire brother to the Lord Maguire, Redmond McRosse Maguire of [ ] in the said county gent a commander of rebels, Phillipp O'Clerigan of or near Macravilly in the said county yeoman Brian Magaffery and Shane Magaffery of Knockballimore husbandmen [in the same county] and divers others whose names he knoweth not.

And the deponent for his own part fled into the woods to save his life, and was hotly pursued and as it were hunted up and down for 3 days together by the rebels especially by the said Redmond McRosse, who in his pursuit meeting with this deponent's son of about 14 years of age at a woodside "closse to a thickett" where this deponent was hiding said unto the boy these words vizt "Sirrah, where is your father". The boy answered "I doe not know" whereunto he replied "if I could fynd him I would make hawksmeate of his bones" which words this deponent heard very plainly. And thinketh in his conscions that that rebel with the other horsemen also rebels as he had in his company would have killed him (as they had done about 40 others of the English of his neighbours that morning) if they had known he had "bin soe nere at hand" as he was. Howbeit those bloody "villaines" went away. And after in the hight following this deponent and his wife and children fled into the county of Cavan where they were "rifled and strippt" of all the clothes they had and still as they got any new supply they were stripped again of the same, so as in passing of 12 miles they were stripped 28 times. And of the county of Cavan they escaped to the house of the late right honourable the Earl of Westmeath to his house Cloinn, where they were freely entertained and this deponent served there the said earl as his cook for 6 months or thereabouts and then he and his wife and children escaped to Trim.

And afterwards (as this deponent hath been credibly informed by some of the English servants of the said earl and "verely beleeveth" it) that the said earl in his coming away towards Trim in his coach, was by the wicked rebel Sir Thomas Newgent Knight and Robert Newgent of Drumcrie esquire both of the county of Meath and their rebellious soldiers forceably "drawne and halled" out of his said coach and shot with "pistoll shott into the thigh" and then in pulling and drawing him "vpp and downe" they drew both his shoulders "out a ioynt", of which that noble earl (being above 60 years old, blind of his eyes and often struck with a dead "palsie" died).

And this deponent further saith that the very first day of the present rebellion that the deponent was so robbed or within 2 days after, the said Rory Maguire and his bloody and rebellious crew murdered massacred and killed these English protestants following vizt Mr Arthur Champin and Thomas Champin his brother, Christopher Linas [?] Mr Thomas Iremonger then sub-sheriff of the county of Cavan and another gentleman that was sub-sheriff of the county of Fermanagh, Thomas Sergeant Maxy Tibbs Miles Acres Barsin Cottingham Thomas Smith James Dungeon Peter Morison James Sweetwood Thomas Allen Robert Workman Lieutenant Lloyd Robert Bingham Richard Crosse Henry Crosse Joseph Crosse Thomas Tinsley Robert Johnson Richard Hill [?] Raph Browne John Furbort the elder John Furbort the younger Anthony Furbort and Thomas Furbort.

Sworn 8th January [?] 1643 before Henry Jones Henry Brereton. [Examined]

28. Thomas Wenslow of Derrivore in the county of Fermanagh gent [aged 24 years or thereabouts] sworn and examined saith that in the beginning of the present rebellion that is to say on or about the 23"th" of October 1641 one James Maguire of Knocknynny and Cahill Maguire of the same in the said county gentlemen both brothers and John McCorry of Gartharee in the said county gent, and a great number of other rebels whose names he cannot express, came in hostile manner to this deponent's said house and surprised and ransacked the same, and forceably took away from him this deponent a great number of his beasts cattle horses household goods and other things of the value and to his loss of 300 pounds and expelled him his possession of his land and farms worth clearly 35 pounds per annum [whereof he "accompteth" to have lost 3 years profit amounting to 105 pounds. And they also dispoiled him of debts and monies worth 65 pounds. And the deponent is like to be deprived of the future profits of his said lands and farms worth 35 pounds per annum clearly until a peace be established]. And the same rebels also about the same time robbed and spoiled all other his "brittish" protestant neighbours in the country thereabouts of their goods and means. And about Christmas after that time those and other rebels to the number of 2,400 by their own expressions and as he thinketh because he saw them, gathered together and came to Lisgoole, the house of one Mr Seagraue, where they found about "fowrscore" English protestants men women and children all which they then and there murdered burned and put to death "saueing" only two persons vizt Mr James Dunbarr and a woman who they took prisoners and restrained for some time. And together with the protestants they burned the said house and all that escaped the flame saving those too they murdered with their swords "pykes skeanes" and other weapons. And as for him this deponent they forced him to stay amongst them, and to do them (as he did) some unwilling servant for about a month together and in the time that he stayed with them he was forced a "martch" along with them to Lisgoole aforesaid [from thence] to the castle of Monyeagh, when and where the said rebels slew and murdered 8 more protestants. From thence they "martched" to the castle of Tullogh where (by their own confessions) they promised those protestants that where there which were in number about 4 score "foure" quarters, and that they should go away with their apparel and clothes but when they had delivered up their arms and the castle then those perfidious and "mercilies" rebels in the "bawne" of the same castle, first stripped them of all their clothes and then and there cruelly massacred and murdered them all.

And further saith that the same rebels and one Rory McBrian McShane Maguire of Ramone in the county of Fermanagh and his soldiers about the beginning of December 1641 at a place near Cordiller in the same county slew and wickedly murdered by hanging them to death one Gilbert Vance of Portoran gent a Scotchman Michell Belfore of the same gent another Scotchman, Edward McBright of the same gent. And about or after that time they also hanged to death one John Ogle gent a protestant.

And further saith that so many of the parties as he knoweth and can remember to have been actors in the present rebellion and to "haue borne armes" with four and amongst the other rebels and these that follow vizt Colonell Rorie Maguire Lieutenant Colonell Donohoe Dane [?] Maguire his uncle Hugh Maguire son to Brian Maguire, Macohourt [?] of Tempoe esquire captain Daniell Maguire Phelim Reagh McManus another captain Redmond oge Maguire of Gartevally gent another captain Cohonot Maguire another captain Turlogh oge Maguire another captain Flaerty McThomas Maguire of Streamott [?] gent Don Maguire McThomas of Aghundiaiagh [?] gent John Roe McThomas Maguire of Tatenerewes [?] gent Brian McRory Maguire of Gartnakesh gent Tearnan Roe McCue of Caroureogh [?] gent James oge Maguire of Ballikikome gent Tho[mas] oge Maguire of Dromully gent Phelim McPatrick Maguire of Drumully gent Hugh McCurry of Killimakan gent Brian Reagh McCorry of the same Phillipp Roe Maguire of Collohill gent John McPhelim Duff Maguire of Cordamer [?] gentleman Cohanat Maguire of Clonally gent, all of the county of Fermanagh.

Sworn 16th January 1643 before Henry Jones and Henry Brereton. [Examined]

29. Mary Silliard late wife of Francis Silliard of the parish of Clanelley in the county of Fermanagh gent, sworn and examined deposeth and saith that when the present rebellion began and by means thereof, her said husband and she were deprived and robbed [or otherwise dispoiled] of their means goods and chattels [worth 565 pounds and above] [consisting of cows "heffers" household goods apparel ready money due debts, the value of their farm and corn in ground amounting in all to the value and to their present loss of 565 pounds sterling besides the loss of their "truncks" and writings whereof she can give no estimate]

And further saith that the rebels that so dispoiled and robbed her and her said husband of their said goods and estate were, and that also robbed other protestants within the said county and committed divers "outrags" and cruelties in hostile and rebellious manner are these that follow vizt Flaherty Maguire of the Mack in the county of Fermanagh gent Edward Maguire Rory Maguire and his brother, and another of their "bretheren" whose Christian name she cannot remember, Morris Ballogh of the Mack aforesaid farmer, Edward [ ] this deponent's next neighbour, Phelim Maroly of the Mack aforesaid "Wander[er] (?) and Edward Shane and one other of his brothers whose "Chrissen" name she knows not, Donnell O'Sheriden of Derrihooley a schoolmaster, one Charles [ ] who is a tall black and hath his beard and face very hairy and lived at Derrihooe whose Christian name she doth not remember. Howbeit that merciless and cruel rebel bound this deponent and her husband's hands on their backs and then struck at them with a sword but wounded them not because he was prevented by one Phillip McShane [yet] that rebel and the rest in his company then robbed and stripped this deponent and her husband of all their clothes, and of the money which they had in their [?] "shooes" and them kept also as prisoners from Saturday 23 "d" of October 1641 till "Tewsday" following and then near the church of Clanally [?] aforesaid one of the rebels then [present] suddenly run his sword into this deponent's husband's sides and likewise wounded him [in] the head, and then they cut and wounded her the deponent in two places of her hand, and with a thrust of a "skeane broake a ribb" in her side and then they wounded her other hand so as she is lo[ ]ed of some of her "fingers" of both hands and those "bloddie villaines" or some of them also run her said husband into his "brest" and likewise into his belly with a pitchfork, and another "villanous" rebel run the deponent's husband (lying on the ground) through the bulk of his body with a sword so that the point appeared at his back, and he instantly (so mortally wounded) died. And the deponent so wounded in both hands and the side, was suffered to escape away naked, and "ly" all night so wounded and naked in a wood, and the next morning God almighty gave her the strength and ability to rise and go from thence so as she got to Belturbet.

And the deponent further saith that the rebels aforenamed or some in their company did the "Tewsday" aforesaid murder and put to death one Charles Lycense an English protestant and his son (about 12 years of age) whom after they had barbarously slain they took up upon a pitchfork and cast him into a river. And this deponent hath credibly heard and beleiveth and presently knoweth it to be true that the rebels the very first day of the present rebellion murdered one Myles Acrigg this deponent's brother-in-law near "Macrevilly" in the said county of Fermanagh and that there were also slain by them one Tho[mas] Sergeant Maxy Turner als [ ] and many others whom she cannot name all protestants.

Sworn 17th April 1643 before John Watson John Sterne. [Examined]

30. Elizabeth the relict of Hamon Fletcher late of Litterkeme [?] in the county of Fermanagh, Smith, sworn saith that her said husband then alive, and she were deprived and robbed [or otherwise dispoiled] of their goods and chattels at Litterkeme aforesaid of the value and to their loss of 162 pounds sterling by Edmund O'Connelley of Killangford husbandman, and Edward O'Connelley of the barony of Lurge in the said county husbandman Nicholas Edwards of Kyllangford aforesaid labourer and others the soldiers and servants of the arch rebel Rory Maguire who carried some of the said goods to Castlehasset then in the possession the said Rory.

And further saith that Patrick Maguire the deponent's late servant and Cohonogh Maguire his brother both labourers, assisted and joined with the rest in robbing the deponent and her neighbours and that Brian Boy Macaffrey and "appart[ner]" [?] and Shane McIlmagh is a half-brother, Neile Boy their kinsman, Owin Makefee a Turn[ er] also forceably took away some of the deponent's goods.

And further saith that one Rory Cashedy (a bloody rebel) did as himself confessed, in Christmas 1641 kill this deponent's husband at Litterkeine aforesaid and stripped him of his clothes which rebel or some other that had a hand with him in that murder gave the deponent's husband divers "greivous cutts" and wounds in his head, and stabbed a broad "skeane" through his throat and gave him divers other mortal wounds and hurts and the deponent was left stripped of all her clothes but those poor ones on her back and had no means for herself and her 4 children but at the mercy of the rebels who by credible report murdered a great number of the protestants thereabouts by the sword, hanging, drowning, starving and other cruel tormenting deaths.

And further saith that amongst other murders committed by the rebels in that part of the county of Fermanagh they there by the command and assistance of Hugh McAdegin Maguire (a popish "Preist" and a most bloody villain) hanged 14 protestants of her neighbours vizt William and John Bell and the eldest son of the said William Bell, Francis Hartborne, one Coates "Taylor", Tho[mas] Boone a "Clothier" and one Nicholas that was a butcher but for the rest she cannot remember their names.

Sworn 16th August 1643 before Henry Jones Edr[ ] Pigott. [Examined]

31. Alice Champin the late wife of Arthur Champin late of Shanoge in the county of Fermanagh esquire being duly sworn deposeth and saith [that the 23"th" of October last past her said late husband [was robbed and deprived of his goods and estate] was lawfully in his own right possessed of goods and chattels "reall" [?] and personal and seized of lands and tenements to him and his heirs; that is to say possessed of jewels plate and ready money then in his castle and "Macon" house of Shanoge aforesaid to the value of 820 pounds; in household stuff hangings "carpetts bedding lynnen" and other implements and furniture and necessaries to the value of 500 pounds; in cattle to the number of 70 of English breed worth 110 pounds, 112 sheep worth 30 pounds corn in the ground "sowen" and in the "hagyeard and chambers" and other winter provision of the value of 110 pounds of leases of the clear yearly value of 75 pounds per annum, which for 3 years purchase worth 225 pounds, of debts by bombed "specialties conveiancs and assurancs for money lent and trusted to the value of 6 thousand nyne hundred seventie one pownds, and seized of "mannors" lands tenements and hereditaments of inheritance vizt of the "mannor" and lands of"Shannoge" and other lands in the barony of Clankelly and county of Fermanagh of the yearly value of 140 pounds, the manor and lands of Castle Coole alias Castle Atkinson in the county aforesaid, of the clear yearly rent during the joint lives of Captain Roger Atkinson and Edith his wife of 20 pounds per annum, and after the decease of either of them of the clear yearly rent of 100 pounds per annum and after the death of the survivor of them, then the whole profits and rents of the said manors and lands of Castle Coole alias Castle Atkinson aforesaid were to remain unto him the said Arthur Champin and his heirs forever being of the clear yearly rent of 200 pounds per annum and upwards. And out of the manor and lands of the right honourable the Earl of Kildare lying and being in the province of Munster and county of Limerick of the yearly rent of 200 pounds per annum for 7 years yet to come or thereabouts making in the whole for that time 1,400 pounds. In lands tenements houses and leases for years some for 40 and some for 60 or thereabouts in and near "adioyneing" to the city of Dublin of the clear yearly rent of 51 pounds per annum or thereabouts.

And this deponent further saith] that the 23"th" day of October [1641] her said late husband was assaulted and cruelly murdered before his own "gats" at Shanoge aforesaid by the Maguires and others their adherents whereof she well remembreth that there were present at the same murdering of him Don Carroge Maguire of [ ] in the of Fermanagh gent, Edmund Carragh Maguire of Annahard in the said county gent, Redmond McOwen Maguire of [ ] in the said county gent, and Patrick oge McRosse Maguire of Eorsadla [?] in the said county gent and others to the number of 100 persons or thereabouts. And that they murdered and killed also with him the said Arthur Champin and 6 other persons at Shanoge aforesaid as namely Thomas Champin Thomas Iremonger Humphery Littlebury and Christopher Linis gent John Morrice and Hugh Williams yeomen.

And that afterwards they killed and murdered thereabouts about the number 24 Englishmen more.

And she hath heard the said rebels say that they were specially commanded and directed by the Lord Maguire (now in the Castle of Dublin) that they should not spare the said Arthur Champin her husband, but murder and kill him and the Crosses that were his followers and tenants. And saith that after they had "kild" him the said Arthur Champin they murdered and killed Henry Crosse and did hang "vp" Joseph Crosse, as they were commanded by the said Lord Maguire. And afterwards they forceably entered the said Castle of Shanoge, and upon all other the goods and chattels jewels money plate household stuff stock of cattle corn "mannor" and lands aforesaid within the county of Fermanagh aforesaid. And immediately after they had so entered the said castle they burned it down to the ground. Also they burned the Castle of Coole alias Castle Atkinson, which said castles and buildings are valued at 1,600 pounds.

And also saith that by the general insurrection and rebellion of the Irish in this kingdom she hath "bin" and still is in hazard of the "looseing" all her rents houses and lands near the city of Dublin aforesaid.

And further saith that she hath heard it spoken by the rebellious Irish in the said county that they had done nothing in this their rebellion but what they had the king's broad seal to "shew" for and that the now Bishop of Londonderry was to take the city of Londonderry on their behalf; and that they had done nothing but what her majesty well knew of and was privy unto.

And further they said that Sir Phelim O'Neill should be king of Ireland and that the said Sir Phelim had received divers letters from her majesty to this purpose that they went not about their work wisely.

Likewise the said rebels said that the Earl of Strafford was the plotter of this their rebellious "riseing". And if that the said earl had "bin" living they should not have had so much trouble in vanquishing of Ireland as they have had, and that the said earl of Strafford's son was gone over into England to raise forces to come over again into this kingdom to "releeve" and help them the rebels. And she heard the said rebels also say that they would send 15,000 Irishmen over into England before Midsommer [ ] [ ] "releeve" the papists and that they would give a great [ ] of [ ] on condition they had our [?] "gratious" King Charles his head.

And further saith that the said rebels would not permit and suffer a corpses of the [ ] so murdered at the castle of Shanoge aforesaid to be buried until such time as a quarter of one of the persons so murdered was devoured and eaten by "doggs". The said rebels did learn [as she heard them boast themselves) in the castle of Lisgoole within the county of Fermanagh of Scotch and Englishmen women and children the number of 90 persons or thereabouts. And that after one of the said women who leaped out of a window to save herself from being so burned was cruelly murdered and killed by them and the next morning they "findeing a yong chyld of his lying sucking the dead mother's breast they kild the said child and when the said house was so burning the said rebels said amongst themselves "reioyceingly" "oh how sweetly doe them fry". She heard them also say that they had killed so many Englishmen, that the grease of fatt that thereby remained upon their swords or "skeanes" might have made an Irish candle.

And she likewise heard that at the town of Belturbett in the county of Cavan the said rebels had drowned of English women and children the number of 30 persons or thereabouts and further saith that she was at the very first restrained and kept as a prisoner with and by the said rebels with whom she so remained for the space of 19 weeks and until she gave unto one Laughlin Roe McMaghan one of the said rebels the value of 20 pounds for his pains and reward to "convey" her from them, and carry her "saffe" to one Mr Edward Dowdales of Munckstoune in the county of Meath near unto the hill of "Tarrah" which he did, and there he left her, whom the said Mr Dowdall did furnish with men and horses to have brought her safe to Castleknock but upon her way about Dunshaghlin certain other rebels there met her, took from her the said horses and forced her to return back to Munckstoune aforesaid where she remained until the late expedition, and going out of the English army into the county of Meath when one Sir Richard Greenvill and Sir Thomas Newcomen coming on to the said Mr Dowdalls house at Munckstown aforesaid where this deponent then was, the said Sir Thomas Newcomen knowing this deponent, she was by then delivered and "convoyed vp" by a safe guard to the city of Dublin and within that time of her so being amongst them heard and saw what she deposeth.

And further saith that divers rebels coming from Tredarth divulged and commonly gave out that the Earl of Ormond the Lord Dillon and the Lord of Howith had surprised and taken Dublin and had parted it amongst them so as they in the north needed not to trouble themselves to come there; and that the consultation at Tredarth was that the Lord of Ormond should for that exploit be made King of Ireland. But afterwards when the rebels heard that the Earl of Ormond had not taken Dublin but contrarywise did pursue the rebels then they grievously exclaimed against him and cursed him, calling him the base and treacherous Lord of Ormond and traitor and using many other "fowle and opprobrious" words against him.

Sworn 14 April 1642 before John Watson and William Aldrich. [Examined]

32. Richard Morse Clerk rector of the parish of Enismc ghant in the county of Fermanagh [of the age of 50 years or thereabouts duly] sworn saith that he this deponent upon the 24th and 25th of October last 1641 about the "howres" of one or two of the clock in the "afternoore" was robbed and spoiled of all his [estate goods and chattels worth 1,280 pounds] [personal estate and expelled from his farms living and means of the value and to his loss of 1,282 pounds. And saith that he was so robbed of his goods cattle and corn at his farm and house situate on a pate or parcels of land called Derricorby] by, and by the means of Captain Rory Maguire, Captain Ric[hard] Neugent his father in law and "confederats and alyes" vizt Thomas oge Maguire of the barony of Kinally in county aforesaid gent Hugh McShane oge Maguire Thomas Maguire, Knogher Maguire and Patrick Maguire of Killelahard in the county aforesaid and (as this deponent is since credibly informed) the said Tho[mas] oge Maguire is now dwelling in the stone house of this deponent "scituate" on the tate of land called Donghat [?]. And that the said Hugh McShane oge Maguire [Thomas Maguire Knocker Maguire] oth in habit in one other stonehouse of this deponent's erected on the land called Derrycorby; and that the other vizt Tho[mas] Maguire, Knogher Maguire and Patrick Maguire are dwelling on the tate of land called Killelahard and that the said Maguires together with one Knogher O'Mehan (some time a servant to this deponent) have robbed him as aforesaid of his said goods and divided and shared the same amongst them.

And further this deponent saith that some of the company under the command of the said Rory Maguire upon the 25th day of October aforesaid did (in a most barbarous cruel and inhuman manner) strip this deponent out of all his apparel naked, and in like manner used his wife and 6 small children and 2 servant, leaving some of them only their smocks and some "peecs of raggs" which hardly could cover their shame. And at that time did beat and wound this deponent and were like to have murdered him. And in this naked and distressed manner the said Rory caused some of his company to drive his wife 6 children and his servants and many more out of the said town of Castlecoole to which they fled for refuge from whence this deponent with his family aforesaid in this distressed condition (among divers of the inhabitants of the said town of Castlecoole and of the parish of Drumully in the county aforesaid) travelled to the town of Belturbett in the county of Cavan where remaining by the space of one week, and being "releeved" by some of his good friends in that town, did afterwards, with his wife and family aforesaid depart from that town of Belturbett with divers hundreds of British protestant inhabitants in the said town and near unto the same and upon the third day of November last near the town called Youghill in the said county of Cavan this deponent and his wife and family aforesaid were again violently and cruelly set upon by the rebellious inhabitants of the said county of Cavan and there again stripped of all their clothes which were bestowed on them by their friends at Belturbett and this deponent beaten and sore hurt in his left hand and deprived of the use of one of his fingers: by which cruel dealing one of the deponent's children died and 3 others being thereby lame and sick and not able to travel are left behind in the said county of Cavan at the mercy of the enemy and knoweth not what is "becomen" of them. And this deponent's wife and 2 children "scant well recouered" yet of their lameness and sickness, which they had gotten by the cruel dealing of the Irish aforesaid.

And also this deponent saith that by means of the rebellion of the said Rory Maguire and other his "confederats" in the North he is deprived of the "enioyment" of the profits of the said rectory of Enismcshanot worth 160 pounds per annum whereof he this deponent is and hath been the incumbent for the space of 3 years past and upwards.

Sworn 31st December 1641 before Henry Jones and John Watson. [Examined]

33. Margaret Farmenie and Margaret Leathley widows both of Acrashanigan in the parish of Clowness and county of Fermanagh sworn say that on the 23"th" of October 1641 in the morning Laughlin Duff and Patrick McMaghan Laughlin McCaroll Phillipp Roe Shane McCullen and certain other of the rebels within the said county to the number of 100 persons or thereabouts robbed these deponents of [their goods] [cattle worth 50 pounds corn and hay worth 10 pounds household stuff and provision worth 4 pounds and deprived them of a lease worth 20 pounds and of 5 pounds in ready money].

And further say that the said rebels bound both these deponents hands behind them urging them to confess money and that they bound the husband of the said Margrett and dragged him up and down in a rope and cut his throat in her own sight with a "skeane" having first"knockt him downe and stript him". And having then also murdered 14 persons more [all English protestants] they the said rebels alledging" that they had the king's broad seal to strip and starve all the English and that they were the king's soldiers.

And as these deponents came up to Dublin they were stripped by the Irish 7 [?] times in a day, and came up stark naked to Dublin being aged women about 75 years old or thereabouts, the said rebels bidding them to go and look for their god, and let him give them clothes.

Sworn 3rd January 1641 before John Sterne and William Hitchcock. [Examined]

34. Edward How[?] of the parish of Galoone [ in the diocese of Clogher half barony of Coole and] in the county of Fermanagh Clerk [being duly sworn] deposeth that on or about the 23"th" of October last and past he was robbed of and lost [ goods worth 194 pounds [?] [book debts, a gelding a lease which he had of a parcel of land near Fathen [?] for 50 odd years and clothes and household stuff to the value or sum of 194 pounds sterling] by the hands [ and means] of Owen McMaghan of the barony of Dartrie and county of "Monoghan" Towell McMaghan of the same barony and county of "Monoghan" and Ardill McMaghan of the barony and county aforesaid with many others.

This deponent heard Donogh Maguire say (when Hugh McMahan of the county of Fermanagh excused my Lord Maguire and said that others had persuaded him of late to "stirr" in this action) that my Lord Maguire knew of it long before and so did all the nobility and men of quality that were papists in this kingdom.

Moreover he heard Con oge McCon McHugh McMaghan of Aghneholagh and county of "Monoghan" say that if my Lord Lieutenant had not "bin" put to death they had not made this insurrection. And further that there was an act made by the present parliament of England: that all [papists] there or elsewhere in this kingdom should go to the church otherwise be hanged "att their owne dores", and therefore they would begin with us lest we should begin with them here, as they did in England for he saw they had hanged a Jesuite in London which was the Queen's Chaplen".

Sworn 29th January 1641 before Henry Jones and John Sterne. [Examined]

35. George Fercher of Toneheige parson of the parish of Cleenish within the county of Fermanagh [barony of Clanally and diocese of Clogher being duly sworn] deposeth that about the 23d of October now last past, and about "tenn aclock" in the morning he was robbed of and lost all his estate goods and chattels [worth 980 pounds besides his church means] [of the value of 980 pounds besides all which he was robbed of and lost the parsonage of Cleenish whereof he hath "bin" incumbent these 7 years by [?] past in August last, being worth per annum 200 pounds] by the means or hands of the rebels Phelim O'Cassidy, Redmont McHugh, Patrick oge McJames McManus and divers of the Maguires as he understood all of the county of Fermanagh and barony of "Cloonally" being under the command of Brian [?] McCohonaght Maguire.

And this deponent did hear Conn oge McMaghan of the county of "Monoghan" and barony of Dartrie say that what they did against the English was done by comission from his majesty and that all the Scottish nation was joined with them in a covenant for the extirpation of the English, and to that affect (he said) he was able to let the deponent see the Earl of Arguile his hand together with the hands of the greatest part of the prime nobility of Scotland. And further saith that for certain one Edmund Wilkinson ourate of the parish of "Clownesse" in the county of "Monoghan" did revolt from the faith and went to mass shortly after the beginning of the rebellion, and thereafter having liberty to repair unto Dublin was killed by the rebels in the way.

Sworn 4th January 1641 before Henry Jones and Rau[fe] Adams. [Examined]

36. Edward Slack of Gorteene O'Mucklagh in the parish of Kinaly within the county of Fermanagh Clerk duly sworn saith that on or about the 23"th" day of October 1641 about ten of the clock in the forenoon he was robbed of and lost his goods and chattels [worth 361 pounds 19 shillings and 4 pence] [and leases the value of 361 pounds 19 shillings and 4 pence by and by the means of Brian McRory Maguire, Dun McThomas Maguire Shane Roe McThomas McGuire, Redmond oge McJames McGuire Patrick oge McDonnell Maguire and divers others who called the deponent base "roague" when he offered to resist them when they were taking of his goods away and said what they did do to him and others they had authority for it under the king's hand from Scotland.

He further saith that on the 24th day of October 1641 aforesaid the said rebels took this deponent's bible opened it and laying the open side in a puddle of water "lept" and stamped upon it saying a plague on it. This book hath "bredd" all the quarrel. And they hoped that within 3 weeks all the bibles in Ireland should be used as that was or worse and that none should be left in the kingdom. And the rebels burnt the deponent's house and after some other rebels cut and wounded him twice in the head.

Sworn 4th January 1641 before us Henry Jones and William Aldrich. [Examined]

37. Robert Barton of Newtowne alias Castlecoole in [the parish of Drumully half barony of Coole and] the county of Fermanagh blacksmith [aged 65 years or thereabouts being duly sworn] deposeth, that on the 25th day of October 1641 he was robbed of and lost his goods chattels and means at Newtown aforesaid [to the value of 151 [?] pounds sterling] by and by the means of Captain Rory Maguire of Hassetstowne in the barony of Lurge in county aforesaid, Donogh Maguire of the barony of "Maherestaphany" in the said county esquire uncle to the said Lord Maguire and divers other Irish men to the number of 400 or thereabouts that did rise into rebellion with the said Captain Rory and the rest.

And further deposth that he did the same day see Lieutenant William Greham of Lisnemallett in the barony of Clankelly in county aforesaid, Ambrose Care [ ] his kinsman Archibald Johnson son in law to the said Lieutenant and divers other Scotchmen with them in company with the said Rory and the rest of the rebels and that the said rebels did not in any wise meddle with or mollest them.

And further deposeth some Irish rebels near to Virginia in the way towards [ ] did strip this deponent [and his wife and children of their clothes in frost and snow] and said that they had a new king, and had a commission from him for what they did.

And further deposeth that he heard that the said Rory or some of his company had murdered of the said parishers to the number of 40 or thereabouts.

Sworn 5th January 1641 before Henry Braroton and William Aldrich and William Hitchcock. [Examined]

38. Charles Shorter of Callahill in the parish of Kinawly [barony of Knockniny] and county of Fermanagh blacksmith [aged 40 years or thereabouts being duly sworn] deposeth that he the 23"th" of October last 1641 was robbed of his goods and chattels [worth 103 pounds] [in all amounting to the sum of 103 pounds] by Patrick oge Maguire of Knockniny aforesaid gent Fleartach Maguire of the same gent Donn Maguire of the same gent John Maguire of the same gent Tirlagh oge Maguire of the same gent and divers others of the Irish rebels that took up arms and was in rebellion with them.

And further deposeth that the said rebels said that what they did they had the king's broad seal for it and that they did it for the Queen.

And further saith that the said rebels stripped this deponent's wife and 3 small children of all their clothes and that Mary one of the deponent's children flying for her life, he left behind him whom (he is credibly informed) was after found [?] murdered either by the forenamed rebels or some other.

And this deponent further saith that about the 1st of November last he saw "fowrteene" English protestants murdered by the rebels and at that time they stripped them upon a hill near Cavan of all their clothes.

And this deponent further saith that he saw the foresaid rebels with their "complicees" drag Mrs Slack widow late wife to Mr James Slack parson of "Eneskilling" into her own house swearing they would have arms and when Arthur Maguire her servant took part with his mistress and endeavoured to defend her from their outrages the said rebels twice knocked the said Arthur down and miserable beat her.

Sworn 5th January 1641 before John Wats on and Roger Puttock. [Examined]

39. Patrick O'Brian of the parish of Galoone [in the diocese of Clogher, half barony of Coole] and county of Fermanagh [and Irish protestant being duly sworn] deposeth that on or about the 23"th" of October last and past about 8 [?] of the clock in the forenoon he was [robbed of and lost in] his goods and chattels [worth 173 pounds] [the value of 173 pounds sterling] by the hands of Donogh Maguire of the county of Fermanagh, Patrick McCollo McDonell, Knockballimore in the county aforesaid, Brian McSr [?] Patrick McArt Moile McMahon of the county of "Monoghan [ Conn oge of Terveyan of barony of Laghty] and Ballibetagh of Terveyan and barony of Laghtie", Con oge McCon McHugh McMahon of Agheneholagh in the county of Monaghan, Phillip McShane Boy McMaghan of Armagh in the same county accompanied with divers base rogues (which said Donogh Maguire [then] said that it was against his will that this, meaning the insurrection was begun but seeing he had put to his hand, he would not give out, for if he should come in he should be used like "Tirone" who was prosecuted, notwithstanding many his pardon.

And the said Con oge McCon McHugh McMaghan said that the king knew of this rebellion, and that it was as hot in England and Scotland as here at the same time.

And he further said that all the nobility of this kingdom which were papists, had a hand in this plot, as well as my Lord Maguire and Hugh oge McMaghan and that they expected aid out of Spain by one Owen Roe O'Neill vizt "tenn thowsand" men and arms for as many.

Also the said deponent further saith that he heard Colonel Plunckett say that he knew of this plot 8 years ago, but that was in these 3 years then last past, he has been more fully acquainted with it. The causes of this deponent's knowledge thereof is that he in the beginning of the rebellion was sent with a letter unto the said Colonel Plunckett from Mr Nicholas Willoughby, and then he heard the same words from the said Mr Plunckett as aforesaid.

Upon the said 23"th" of October there were killed of this deponent's neighbours (as Don Carragh Maguire told the deponent when he came to rob and spoil his house, with Donnogh Maguire and others, by him the said Donn, and by Patrick McRosse Maguire Edmund Carragh Maguire and divers others) these protestants vizt of Mr Arthur Champin Mr Thomas Iremonger Mr Thomas Littleberry the sub-sheriff of that county Thomas Champin Christopher Linams [ ?] John Morrice and an Irishman: Henry Crosse Miles Acres Thomas Sargent, Maximilian Tibbs Thomas Aston Peter Madeison and Sabastian Cottingham James Whitwood Joseph Crosse, Ensign [ ?] Lloyd Robert Johnson and Michaell Allen.

And saith that Rory Maguire did hang Eleazer Middleton Clerk of the peace in the county of Fermanagh, Christopher Cotes and many others whose names the deponent cannot remember.

And further saith that Owen McMaghan of Drunagran in the county of "Monoghan" (as he credibly heard by Mr Nicholas Willoughby another) followed him this deponent 20 miles and vowed (if they took him) to kill him.

Sworn 29th January 1641 before Henry Jones and John Sterne. [Examined]

40. John Shorter of Callahill [in the parish of Kinawly] and county of Fermanagh Smith [ aged 38 years or thereabouts being duly sworn] deposeth that he was robbed [ of and lost] on the 23"th" of October last about 10 of the clock in the "forenoone" all his goods and chattel [worth 20 pounds] [ worth in all 20 pounds] by John alias Shane Roe Maguire of Knockninny aforesaid gent Patrick oge Maguire of the same gent, Don Maguire of the some gent, Tirlogh oge Maguire of the same gent and divers others Irish rebels that took up arms and was in rebellion with them to the number of 3 score or thereabouts and stript this deponent his wife and I child of all their clothes, saying that they had it under the king's hand to take all the goods of the English and were to carry them to a tate of land called Mullalogh in the said barony the next day where a frier was to preach, and there a son of Brian Maguire of Demp[ ] in the said county esquire was to view the same, and to be their captain or words to that effect.

And further this deponent deposeth that they asked him whither he would go, to whom he answered for England. Then said they this day Dublin Castle is taken, the Tower of London and Castle of "Edenbrough" and you have but 44 "howrs" to live and then both Englishmen women and children shall be slain.

And this deponent being parish clerk of Kinawly aforesaid his admission thereunto is lost in this rebellion.

Sworn 5th January 1641 before Roger Buttock and William Aldrich. [Examined].

41. Elizabeth Dickison of the parish of "Clownesse" in the county of Fermanagh [ being duly sworn] deposeth that she was robbed of goods [worth 40 pounds] worth in all [ ] by Rory Maguire and divers other rebels on the 23"th" of October last past. And further deposeth that some of the said Maguires company did in the hearing of this deponent say that the Scotts were to leave never a drop of English blood in England and that the Irish had command to leave never a drop of English blood in Ireland. And that they were the Queen's soldiers.

And further saith that this deponent's husband named Richard Dickison was one of the soldiers that was sent to "releeve" "Droghedah" in which service she feareth her husband was lost.

Sworn 3rd January 1641 before Roger Puttock and Henry Brereton. [Examined].

42. Jathnell Mawe of Ferrigrin in the parish of Drumully in the county of Fermanagh gent [ English protestant aged 44 years or thereabouts being duly sworn] deposeth that he was robbed of [and lost in cattle] his goods and chattels [ worth 160 pounds 6 shillings] [ the value or sum of 160 pounds 6 shillings] by the means of Captain Rory Maguire of Hassetstown, Richard Newgent esquire father in law to the said Lord Maguire Hugh McCahell from Drumballagh in the said county yeoman and divers other Irish rebels assembled in arms with the said Captain Rorie the 23"th" day of October last and past in the day time. And that he, his wife and 5 children were all stripped out of their clothes by the said rebels.

And further deposeth that he heard some of the rebellious Irish company say that there should not be one Englishman woman or child left within the kingdom and that they had the king's broad seal for what they did.

Sworn 3rd January 1641 before Henry Jones and William Aldrich. [Examined].

43. Thomas Sprage of Brenish in the parish of Drumully and county of Fermanagh Skinner [ and English protestant aged 44 years or thereabouts being duly sworm] deposeth that he this deponent was robbed of and lost his goods and chattels [worth in all 36 pounds] worth 36 pounds by the means of Captain Rory Maguire and other Irish rebels rising in rebellion with him the 23"th" day of October last about 8 of the clock in the morning.

And further deposeth that the day following (as he was travelling towards Newtowne to the rest of the English protestants of the said parish) one Patrick oge Maguire of the barony of "Magharestaphany" one of the said Captain Rories company did with a sword give this deponent one wound on his left shoulder and another great and dangerous wound on the back part of his head swearing he would murder this deponent because he was an Englishman.

And further deposeth that one Patrick Maguire and Joane ny Guire of the half barony of Coole did say that the said Captain Rory had the king's hand for what they did and that they were the Queen's soldiers.

Sworn 3rd January 1641 before Richard Puttock and Henry Brereton. [Examined].

44. Richard Braishawe of Aghenehinch in the parish of Drumully in the county of Fermanagh yeoman [ an English protestant aged 37 years or thereabouts being duly sworn] deposeth that he was robbed of and lost his goods and chattels [ worth 910 pounds] [of the value of 910 pounds] the 25th day of October last past by and by the means of Captain Rory Maguire of "Hasset Towne" Donogh Maguire esquire uncle to the Lord Maguire Richard Newgent esquire father in law to the said Lord Maguire with divers other Irish rebels to the number of 400 or thereabouts that did rise in rebellion with the said Captain Rory and the rest. And he his wife and 3 children were all stripped of their clothes and left naked by some of the said rebels. And did hear divers of the company whose name this deponent knoweth not say that what they had done was with the consent and by the directions of the king or to that effect and that he hath heard that the said rebels had murdered 40 of the English protestants that inhabited and lived within the said parish in good manner, or thereabouts and that there is one hundred of the said parishers perished and dead since they were put from their habitations by the said rebels as he "verely beleeveth" and the cause of his belief herein is for that he hath known them to die in such abundance daily.

Sworn 3rd January 1641 before Roger Puttock and Henry Brereton. [Examined]

45. John Mooreton of Port in the parish of Drumully in the county of Fermanagh yeoman [an English protestant aged 32 years or thereabouts being duly sworn] deposeth that he was expelled from his farms and means and robbed of his goods [worth 381 pounds 15 shillings] [of the value of 381 pounds 15 shillings] by the means of Captain Rory Maguire, Donogh Maguire and Richard Newgent esquires and other Irish persons of their company assembled in arms the 22"th" day of October last about 6 "a clock" in the afternoon.

And he this deponent his wife and one child were stripped naked by some of the said company who held naked "skeanes" to this deponent's breast saying "are you not worthy to be killed for holding our lands from us", demanding of this deponent his money and saith what they had done they had authority and commend from the king for it.

And further this deponent deposeth that he did see Richard Morse Clerk preacher of god's word the 25th of the said "moneth stript nakd" by some of the said rebels and did see them beat him with "clubbs and staues (after he was stript vpon his shoulder and back within the church yard at Castlecoole als Newtowne)" but could not hear what words they used, he being a little distant and the noise of the people so great that he could not hear them well.

Sworn 3rd January 1641 before Henry Jones and William Aldrich. [Examined]

46. John Martin of Coranagee in the parish of Clownesse and county of Fermanagh being duly sworn saith that upon the 23"th" of October 1641 about 9 of the clock in the morning he was robbed of [his] goods and chattels [worth 44 pounds] [worth 44 pounds] by the hands of Shane Maguire of Killelakk in the parish and county aforesaid, Turlogh Maguire of the same besides 40 more county aforesaid, Turlogh Maguire of the same besides 40 more in company whose names he knoweth not, who also wounded the said John and also killed Henry Crosse, William Owgden [?] Thomas Cheetam, Thomas Ashton John Maines Thomas Sergeant George Py William Long Sebastian Cottingham Robert Wackmoin [?] Mr Lloyd William Gilstrapes George Whitture [?] John his son Michaell Allan James Witwood Lantus [?] Christopher Dickinson.

And further saith that they were constrained to go to "masse" one day and then turned away naked.

Sworn 4th January 1641 before William Aldrich and Henry Brereton. [Examined]

47. William Moreton of Kinneneber [in the parish of Drumully, half barony of Coole] and county of Fermanagh yeoman [aged 39 years or thereabouts being duly sworn] deposeth that the 23"th" of October last he this deponent was [robbed] of a good estate [worth 600 pounds] [in freehold to him and his heirs forever of one tate and quarter of a tate of land called by the "seuerall" names of Fewgh Mullanecorogh [?] Derrigraine and Corlatt being part and parcel of the proportion of Aghalane in the half barony of Knockninny and county aforesaid David Creichtoun being "cheef" lord of the same, at or under the annual rent of 10 pounds 8 shillings and 4 pence, being well worth 160 pounds: and also possessed by lease of a tate of land called Kinneneber for 99 years from the 1st day of May last and under the annual rent of 24 shillings being part and parcel of the manor of Castle Brinley alias Castle Coole (Sir Stephen Butler knight deceased being late "cheefe" lord of the same) worth 230 pounds, of cattle worth 100 pounds of corn worth 10 pounds of household goods and provision within the house worth 80 pounds of hay, husbandry gear and other goods worth 10 pounds in money 10 pounds, in all amounting to the sum of 600 pounds.

And being so seized and possessed of the said lands leases cattle and goods as aforesaid, was robbed and lost the same by the means of Captain Rory Maguire of Hassettowne and county aforesaid Donogh Maguire esquire uncle to the Lord Maguire Richard Newgent esquire father in law to the said Maguire and other rebellious Irish rising up in arms with the said Captain Rorie vizt of his household goods monies and writings touching his several estates on the 23rd day of October last, his cattle the 24th of the same "moneth" and the rest of his goods and his wife and 5 children stripped the 25th of the same month.

And further deposeth that upon the said 23"th" day of October last, there being about the number of 18 of the said rebels that "besett" this deponent's dwelling house, this deponent discharged a "calliver and a fowleing peece" at the discharging of which piece, one of the rebels (through the window) wounded this deponent in his right hand with a "pyke", very dangerously: some of them giving out in speeches that if he the deponent would not open the door they would fire the household over him whereupon this deponent, his wife and 5 children escaped out of a back window and fled to the woods to save their lives, it being a dark night after which the said rebels "brake" into this deponent's said house, took away his goods and provision and afterwards fired the said house part of which said household goods this deponent did afterwards vizt upon the 25th day of October see in the dwelling house of James Lord Bishop of "Clougher" at Drombrochas in the said barony of Coole and county aforesaid and did see Neale McCabe, Tirlogh Mageere and John Rely, three of the said Bishops men, the 26th day of October aforesaid "breake" upon this deponent's "kill dore" and from thence did take tenn bushells of barly malt or thereabouts" and carried the same to the [said?] Lord Bishop's house.

And further this deponent deposeth that one Isabell a Scochwoman and servant to the said Lord Bishop of "Clougher" (in this deponent's hearing) said that the said Bishop of Clogher had appointed the day following, being the said 26th of October to meet the said Captain Rory Maguire with 200 men to help him to take "Eneskillin".

And further this deponent saith that he did see Lieutenant William Greham in company with the said Captain Rory the said 25th of October and also Ambrose Carlton a kinsman of the said Lieutenant William Greham and they neither directed nor assisted this deponent nor his neighbours but were present with the said Captain Rory without molestation or harm done unto them.

And this deponent further deposeth that he hath heard that the said Captain Rory Maguire or some of his rebellious company had murdered of the English protestants that live in the said parish of Drumully of men women and children 40 in number or thereabouts and that there is at least 100 of men women and children that inhabited and lived in good manner and fashion within the said parish, perished and dead since the said rebels "expulced" and put them out of their habitations and dwellings with their "cruell and vnmercifull" feelings towards the said parties being English protestants.

Sworn 5th January 1641 before Henry Brereton and William Hitchcock. [Examined]

48. Hugh Stokes of Tawnategorman in the parish of "Clownesse" barony of Clankelly and county of Fermanagh gent [being duly sworn before us] deposeth [and saith] that the 23"th" day of October last he was [robbed] [rightfully possessed] of his goods and chattels [and estate] [vizt in cows horses and other cattle to the value of 110 pounds in corn in his "hagard" worth 20 pounds, in household stuff worth 20 pounds and seized of freehold land worth 70 pounds per annum] and that the day aforesaid Edmund Carragh Maguire Ross McGilpatrick Maguire Cormk Roe Maguire Turlagh McHugh McArt Maguire Patrick Magill Duff Maguire accompanied with divers other rebellious persons came unto and forceably entered into this deponent's mansion house and possessed themselves of the same, and of all his goods and chattels aforesaid and "disseised" him of his said lands and that this deponent hardly escaped from them with his life and that they have ever since so forceably withheld the same.

And that they and others of the said rebels the same day murdered and killed divers of this deponent's neighbours and "tennants" as namely Thomas Sergeant Thomas Ashton Thomas Seaton Miles Acrigg Sebastian Cottingham and divers others to the number of 30 persons that were well known to this deponent. And he heard some of them say that they had a commission for their so doing.

Sworn 7th January 1641 before Henry Brereton and William Aldrich. [Examined]

49. Morris Middlebrooke of Knockmakeggan [in the parish of Drumully barony of Clankelly] and county of Fermanagh yeoman [and English protestant aged 44 years or thereabouts being duly sworn] deposeth that he was robbed and lost his goods and chattels worth 420 pounds] [in corn 200 pounds in leases worth 80 pounds in cattle worth 80 pounds in household goods and other goods and husbandry gear worth 40 pounds in debts due upon specialties 20 pounds in all amounting to the sum of 420 pounds] by the means of Captain Rory Maguire of Hassettowne in the barony of Lurge and county aforesaid, Donogh Maguire uncle to the Lord Maguire Richard Newgent esquire father in law to the said Lord Maguire and Patrick McCollo McDonnell of the "colledg" lands in the said county gent, Art McDonnell of the same, Corm[ ack] Ferdroaghe McDonnell of Rosbrick in the parish of "Clownes" and county aforesaid gent, Donogh McDonell of the same, Thomas oge Maguire of Kinawly in the said county gent Tirlogh McThomas Boy [Examined]

64. John Sleaman of Feaghlash in the County of Fermanagh yeoman [being duly] sworn and examined saith that on the 23rd "th" day of October 1641 he was [expelled] deprived and robbed [of his goods and means worth £269] [and otherwise dispoiled of the possession rents and profits of his lands and means of his goods and chattels of the value and to his loss of £269 sterling besides the future profits of his lands worth £20 per annum (which will be lost until a peace be settled)]. By and by the means of Brian McRory Maguire and Rory oge Maguire John Roe McThomas Maguire Phelim O'Cassidy Coconagh McBrian McShane Maguire and Rory McBrian McShane Shane Maguire Shane McFelim Duff Maguire Connor McRory Boy Maguire, Phillip Roe Maguire, John McConnor McRory Boy Maguire, Neile McLoune and Hugh McLoune Henry McLoune Art McMurfy, Cormuck McThomas Duff McCorry, Hughe McCorry all gentlemen and Cormack McCaweley and others of the half of barony of Knockninny in the County aforesaid, they being all followers and belonging to Captain Rory Maguire.

And further deposeth that the said parties that so robbed him commanded him the said John and the rest of his household to depart the "cuntrie presently orels" they would kill them and that for the taking away of his goods and banishing him out of the country they alleged that they had Captain Rory Maguire warrant for the same.

And further saith that the parties hereafter "menconed" are or were actors in the present rebellion, and have carried and "borne armes" amongst them against the Protestants of this kingdom and have "bin" robbers and oppressors of the Protestants, and aiders and"releevers" of the other rebels vizt Connor Modr Maguire, Tirlagh McConnor Modr, Brian oge McEd[war]d Maguire Cahell McEd[war]d Maguire, Phillip McEd[war]d Maguire James McEd[war]d Phillip McEd[war]d Maguire James McEd[war]d Maguire Phillip McThomas Maguire Brian oge McPhillip Maguire, James McPhillip Maguire Thomas McPhillip Maguire, Don McThomas Maguire Fleartheh McThomas Maguire, Phelim Duff McRory Maguire, Ogan O'Farragh Maguire, Manus Maguire, Thomas oge Maguire, Phelim Maguire gent, Cahir McRoe Maguire, John McCory McFelin, James McCory, Donn McCorry, Tirlagh McCorry, Ardill oge McCorry, all gentlemen: Cormuck McThomas McCorry yeoman Thomas McCorry yeoman Cormuck McThomas McCorry yeoman Patrick Ballagh McCorry yeoman, Donnell oge O'Mulpatrick gent] Hugh O'Mulpatrick gent. Brian O'Mulpatrick gent, Hugh McFarrell O'Mulpatrick gent Brian McFarrell O'Mulpatrick gent, Donnell McHugh O'Mulpatrick gent Farrell McBrian O'Mulpatrick gent, Hugh Reagh O'Mulpatrick gent John Reagh O'Mulpatrick Smith, Teige Roe O'Mulpatrick carpenter, Farrell McCorry yeoman, Thomas McCorry Tirlagh McCorry Cahal McCorry John O'Fronty Rory O'Fronty, Laghlin Keagh [?] McMurphy, Tirlagh McMurphy William McMurphy McArt Duff, Phillip McCahell O'Rely, Ph[ ] Duff O'Rely Garott O'Rely, Brian McMihell, Connor McMartin Gelissa McMartin Dermot McMartin Art boy Muckehan Edmund O'Muckian Lag[hlin] O'Muckian Patrick Magaffran Tirlogh McCab[ ] Shane McCabba, Edmund McCabba Patrick McCriv[ ] Patrick McCoile, Tirlagh O'Rely Cormuck McManus, Thomas McManus, Phillip oge McManus Br[ian] McManus, Connor McManus Tirlagh McManus H[ugh?] McCaffry Tirlagh McCaffry Connor McCaffry Shane McCaffry Ogan McCaffry Ogan McVeny Tirlagh McVeny Thomas McVeny Dermott McVe[ny] Cormuck Duff McCassedy all yeoman; Redmondoge Maguire gent, Connor Roe McEdmond Maguire gent, Shane O'Ryhill yeoman, Tirlagh O'Bresselan yeoman, Hugh O'Gellan yeoman Cahill O'Gellan yeoman Tirlagh O'Gellan yeoman Cahell O'Gellan Laha[ ] yeoman: all those whose names are above written are inhabitants of the half barony of Knockenynny and in the parish of Clonnally.

Sworn 26th July 1641 before William Aldrich and William Hitchcock [Examined]

65. Elizabeth Denesberry of Drumrallaghe [in the parish of Drumully half barony of Coole] and County of Fermanagh wife to Thomas Dewsberry of the same Webster [?] now a "souldier" gone to Drogheda under the command of Captain Roger Moignes [she being of the age of 45 years or thereabouts and duly sworn] deposeth that her said husband was robbed and dispoiled of all his goods the 25th day of October last in the "foorenoone about tenn of the clock" viz worth in [all] £112 10s. Od. by Captain Rory Maguire of Hassettown in the barony of Lurge and County of Fermanagh, Edmund McPhillip of the Fewgh in the said county husbandman, Teige McDermott of the same husbandman, and Phelim McMartin of the same husbandman, Donnogh Maguire of Drumrally in the same county [in the same county] husbandman "on Gohannagh" of the same husbandman and other irish rebels in their company to the number of 600 or thereabouts.

And further deposeth that she heard some of the said rebels say that they had the King's commission for what they did and that our religion came up but in King Henry VIIIth "daies" and now we might see what came on it.

And further one Thomas McTirlogh Maguire of Lissagory in the barony of Clankelly and county aforesaid gent, one of the said Captain Rory Maguire his company did say that before the next day at noon, the English Protestants should see what should [see what should] become of them.

And further deposeth that her said husband herself and seven children more were "stript" of all their wearing apparel the same day in the churchyard at Newtowne aforesaid and left naked.

And further saith that they rebels aforesaid or some of them at or about the same time did murder one Mr Christopher Cotes gent and his son Christopher, one Mr Champin, Thomas Sergeant Mr John Maignes, Edward Powlter, Christopher Bustop and Christopher his son, George Dickinson, Thomas Preistley and one Mr Irenmonger this deponents neighbours of Drumrallagh aforesaid and wounded Mrs Elizabeth Cotes and Katherin Dickenson.

And further that she this deponent and her 7 children were stript of all their clothes, two of which children are since dead for want of "fier" and necessaries as she "conceaveth" and other 2 of them lie in danger of death.

Sworn 7th January 1641 before John Sterne and Roger Puttock. [Examined]

Margarett Blower wife to Randle Blower of Newtowne in the County of Fermanagh yeoman duly sworn deposeth that her said husband was robbed and deprived of his goods and chattels [worth £94] [worth in all "fowr score and fowrteene poundes Xs"], by Captain Rory Maguire and other Irish rebels in his company assembled to the number of 400 or thereabouts the 25th day of October last about "tenn of the clock in the foorenoone", and that she and her husband were stript and their wearing apparel taken from them by some of the company of the said Captain Rory, their names this deponent knows not; wishing them to be [?] gone, and that two or her children were stript and had their clothes taken from them in the County of Cavan the 28th day of October aforesaid in the day time about 12 of the clock "nere unto vento the bull".

And further this deponent hath had 2 of her children dead within this"citty" by reason of their said stripping, and other the bad [?] and unmerciful "vnmercifully vsage" of the said rebels; the reason [ ] for that they have ever since their said stripping been sick till they died.

Sworn 15th January 1641 before Roger Puttock and William Hitchcock [Examined]

67. Sarah Ranson of Fagh [?] in the County of Fermanagh [being duly] sworn and examined saith that on the 23"th" day of October 1641 she and her husband Richard Ranson deceased with 5 children were [dispossessed] deprived and robbed [of their goods and means worth £267 10s. Od.] [and stripped of the rents and profits of a lease worth £8 per annum, and are like to be deprived of the future profits thereof until a peace be had; and of cattle horses household stuff hay corn debts ready money and other goods to his loss of £267 10s. Od.] by the rebel Hugh Sherwood of Kilrush in county aforesaid, Corm[ack] McCorry of Formoile yeoman, Knogher Roe O'Mulpatrick of Kilneck yeoman, Patrick McCorry of the parish of Kinnally yeoman, Tirlaghe oge Maguire a bailiff to the sheriff, Redmond McCosker and several others of the said county whose names he knows not, they being followers unto to Captain Rory Maguire.

And further [deposeth] [deposeth] that the parties aforesaid charged her to depart the country otherwise they would murder them all and [saying] that Captain Rory Maguire did authorize them for the taking away of the goods aforesaid.

And further saith that after this deponent was so robbed as aforesaid and"gotten into a boate" on the river near Belturbett to escape away with her servant William Rockett [?] and divers others of the English, several persons of the rebels with great "cotts" boarded them and drowned the said William Rockett her servant. And saith that the names of two of those rebels that so boarded them were Edmund O'Mulpatrick and Patrick O'Mulpatrick both of the parish of Kinnalley aforesaid yeoman.

Sworn 22nd August before John Sterne and William Aldrich. [Examined]

Robert Cheetom of Aghadrunsee in the parish "Clowness" and county of Fermanagh [(an English Protestant) being duly sworn] deposeth that he was robbed and lost the 24th October 1641 of [all his goods and means worth £210] [cattle corn hay debts a lease household goods and other things amounting in all to £210].

And this deponent saith that one Rosse McGilpatrick Maguire and Redmund Maguire his son had 40 of this deponent's said cattle and one Captain Dun Carragh Maguire had his house and all his corn in his "hagard", and those that had the rest of this deponent's goods he knoweth not their names.

And further saith that the women in that county were generally as bloody and forward in all outrageous and rebellious actions as the men.

Sworn 24th May 1643 before Henry Brereton and Rau[ ] Adams [Examined].

68.Marie Hecklefeild the wife of Robert Hecklefeild of Newtowne alias Castlecoole in the county of Fermanagh tanner Sworn [and examined] saith that since the beginning of the present rebellion vizt on or about the 25th of October 1641 this deponent's said husband and she where at Newtowne aforesaid forcible deprived and robbed [of their goods and means worth £500] [and dispoiled of the profits rents and profits of their lands and farm and of other their goods and Chattels consisting of cattle "barque lether" horses corn household stuff provision ready money apparel and other things worth £500 sterling and that they are like to lose the future profits of their lands worth £20 per annum until a peace be established] by and by the means of the said rebel Rory Maguire, Tirlagh McMaghan of Newtowne labourer, Turlogh Balla[rd?] and a great multitude of others whose names she cannot ex[ ] some of which rebels stripped and robbed this deponent and her husband and 5 children of their clothes and then they flying for succour and "releeff" to Croghan Castle, had two of their children there [?] starve to death for want of convenient food. And there also the deponents [said mother] father mother brother and one of her children also suddenly died.

Sworn 30th May 1643 before John Sterne and Henry Brereton. [Examined]

69. Anne Booth of Littergreene of parish of Drumully in County of Fermanagh wife to James Booth of the same tailor (now one of His Majesty's soldiers gone for Droghedah under the command of Edward Aldrich [duly sworn] deposeth that her said husband was robbed and dispoiled of all his goods [chattels and means] the 25th day of October last about "ten a clock in the foornoone" worth £205 [in all amounting to the sum of £205] by the hands action and means of Captain Rory Maguire and one of the sons of James Netterville of the barony of Magharistaphanie in the said county Esquire whose christain name she knoweth not and other irish rebels assembled in their company to the number of 400 or thereabouts. And that she her husband and two children were all stripped and all their clothes taken from them the said day in the churchyard at Newtowne in the said parish, and her other two children stripped and their clothes taken from them within two miles of the said town the next day following, saying they had a warrant from the said Captain Rory to strip all the English that they met with all in the said county [that when they stripped this deponent "they ript downe her smock with a skeane" she did see some of them with a "skeane" give unto William Browne of the said parish one great wound in his hand?] and the same night that this deponent and her husband where robbed the said rebels imprisoned this deponent and about 20 more in Newtown aforesaid and kept a guard about them all which time one of the soldiers and servants of the said Rory Maguire said that they would show no favour to any for they intended not to leave an Englishman in Ireland but they would have their lands again or else they would lose but their lives goods and lands or to that effect.

And saith that about two days before they robbery aforesaid the said rebels killed one Mr Christopher Cotes and by report they also killed one Abraham James George Dicconson George Randale John Mange gent and Stephen Rickson.

Sworn 8th January 1641 before William Hitchcock and Henry Brereton. [Examined]

70. Thomas Forde [late] of Dromah in the parish of Newtowne in the county of Fermanagh a British Protestant, duly sworn and examined deposeth that about the 23"th" of October last past he was assulted robbed and dispoiled of his [house and] goods and chattels at Dromah by the rebels there [and to the value following vizt of his household goods worth £10 of his cows [ ] cattle and horses worth £33 at the least, of "swyne" and poultry worth 14s. 4d., of implements for a carpenter worth [ ] 10s. 0d. of oats barley and the worth £10 of his lease of Dromah aforesaid worth £52 [?] for that he paid so mucy for the same at May Day last]

But the deponent cannot certainly tell the names of the rebels in regard he was pursued for his life by them and had no time to view them only he heard that one Hughe Maclegevery a near neighbour unto the deponent took away some part of the deponent's goods, and took the deponent's sword and one Turloghe McKelly a young rebel (who was a little before that the deponent's servant) took away part of the deponent's ca[ ] but afterwards they were taken away from him again by other stronger "roagues" (as John Braishawe, who stayed a little behind this deponent and was also robbed related to this deponent).

[And he further deposeth that he lost the lease and possession of a place called Grovagh in the County of "Monoghan" the interest whereof was worth £10 at the beginning of this rebellion.

And he further saith that he this deponent "souled fowre cow[es] unto vento one Robert Wilson and Richard Hooten" of the County of "Monoghan" aforesaid for which they were to pay £8 at May day next but in regard they said Robert and Richard are both robbed and dispoiled (if not killed) by the rebels the deponent expecteth never to receive the same nor any part thereof. And he also lost of corn reaped in the County of "Monoghan" aforesaid worth £5 and of corn in the ground at his several holdings in the Counties of "Monoghan" and Fermanagh worth £3].

And he further saith that he his wife and one child were stripped naked and suffered such torments in their journey towards Dublin that his said wife and children both died.

He further saith that Patrick Maddeson of the parish of "Clounesse" in the County of "Monoghan" in the beginning of this rebellion was indebted to this deponent for "beere corne" the sum of £10 and George Whittacre of Crevagh in the said county was at the same time also indebted to him in the sum of £9 which the deponent accounted as good debts yet in regard of both the said parties are either robbed or killed, or both, the deponent now accounteth the same as lost. And the total of all his losses in goods debts and chattels by the rebels, amounteth unto £150 sterling besides the loss of his wife and children and the many tortures and damages he hath undergone by the same.

Sworn 16th March 1641 before William Aldrich and William Hitchcock [Examined]

71. Suzanna Wynne late of Clantibbrin in the County [of] Fermanagh [sworn and examined] deposeth [and saith] that on the 23"th" of October last her husband Francis Wine and she were robbed [expelled] and dispoiled by the rebels at Clantibbrin aforesaid of their goods and chattels [worth £171 6s. 8d.] [worth in all £171 6s. 8d.] by the rebels Patrick O'Kegley of Clantewran [?] in the said county gent who took possession of the said farm, and the house thereon built, forcible expelled and thrust her this deponent and children out of the possession thereof, one of the rebels and his company drawing his sword and protesting he would kill her unless she left the house, and her husband (for safety of his life) fled away before she, with one young child (whom she carried in her arms) where forcibly driven away leaving "fowre" children amongst the rest of the rebels to their "merciless crueltie". And afterwards this deponent was stripped and robbed of her clothes worth £15, by the wife of the rebel Captain Rory McMahon, and so through the cold and without clothes journeyed up to Dublin being often stayed and tossed to and fro, and after turned back again from Captain to Captain and divers times threatened, and in danger to be slained.

And further saith that about the 4th of December last the rebels Captain Rory and Captain Redmond McMahon late of the Dartry gent (after they had robbed all the English they could), and by and with their soldiers (which were a great number) brought 18 of the Scotts (being all householders) into the town of "Clonwnesse" there imprisoned them in the church, and some ten days after hanged them all on the posts of the churchyard gate in one night by torchlight made of "rishes" which this deponent saw.

Sworn 5th February 1641 before John Sterne and William Aldrich. [Examined]

72. Robert French late of Newtowne in the parish of Drumully [barony of Coole] and County of Fermanagh merchant [duly sworn and examined] deposeth that about the 24th day of October last he was robbed dispoiled and deprived of his goods and chattels and had his house burned [to his loss of £207 9s. 0d.], [to the value of £207 9s. 0d.], all which damage the deponent hath sustained by the means of Captain Rory Maguire and other rebels of his company to a great number, whose names the deponent knoweth not, who also were accompanied with one Captain Newgent that married the Lord Maguires mother one Captain Netterfeild son to a justice of peace in the county of Fermanagh and one Lieutenant Grymes late muster master in those parts and one Arthur Grimes his kinsman and also about 15 or 16 Scotts. And the said Maguire and Newgent came to the church of Newtowne and there tore and rent the bible and threw the leaves of it about. And at the same time they put to death there John Maynes George Dickson Stephen Rixon Christopher Bowser Richard Lewis Thomas Bulman and the said Bowsers son and daughter and one Christopher Coats and 3 or 4 more English Protestants whose names this deponent cannot certainly relate. And also the said rebels stripped this deponent and his wife naked and in the way towards Dublin (after the deponent and his wife were again supplied with clothes) they were afterwards again stripped, and came to Dublin naked.

Sworn 12th March 1641 before Rau[ ] Adams and William Hitchcock [Examined]

73. Dorothy Rampaine late wife of Zacharie Rampaine of Acrinogh in the county of Fermanagh gent deceased [sworn and examined] deposeth [and saith] that [when] the present rebellion began, that is to the say the 23"th" day of October Ann O'Domini 1641, or about that time her said husband (then alive) and she, were by force and arms at Acrinagh aforesaid and near the same deprived [expelled berefth] and dispoiled of [their goods and means worth £1,730] [the possession and profits of their lands farms and of their goods and chattels consisting of beasts cattles horses mares colts sheep ready money household stuff provision utensils corn grain hay "fewell" and other things of the value and to their losses of £1,730 sterling] by the rebels of that county, which (as she hath heard and "verelly beleeveth") are these hereafter named vizt Rory Maguire brother to the Lord of Eniskilling Brian McCoconagh Maguire of [ ] and others of the Maguires their <!-- Unreadable Word --> "confodrats" and adherents within the county of Fermanagh whose christain names she certainly knoweth not.

And further saith that about 5 days after her said husband and John Mayer her own brother, Humphrey Holloway and Robert Wheeler (all Englishmen) having procured a "passe" from Brian McCoconagh Maguire and Captain Rory Maguire, they being sent away with a "gard" of rebellious soldiers to be carried out of the county within 24 hours after the date of the said pass upon pain of death; they, this deponent's said husband and the rest of the English that had the said pass where all "murthered" within the time limited for their pass upon a wild mountain near Donogh Maguire's house by the cruel and rebellious servants and soldiers of the said Donogh Maguire uncle to the now Lord Maguire [who left their bodies unburied, exposed to "beasts and fowles to feed on"]

And this deponent with her four children and [a maid, with one Mris? Holliwood] where stripped of all their clothes and what else they had left and turned away by the rebels in froth and snow on a mountain 8 or 9 miles from their dwellings in the place where her said husband and the rest were so murdered as aforesaid.

And this deponent further saith that when she returned and came back again to Captain Roger Atkinsons house and castle where she and her husband had left some of their household goods, Brian McCoconagh Maguire had possessed himself of that house and castle and of all the arms provision and goods therein. And this deponent was by his rebellious followers denied [?] to come into the said castle at all, or to have any rel[ ] out of her own goods, but was glad to fly away to save her own [?] life. And then she saw her said husbands gelding with, and in the custody of the said Coconagh Maguire at his own house at Tempedassell. Also she did see the said Brian McCoconagh Maguire (after he came in upon Sir William Coles protection) to wear her husband's own cloak, which she well knew, and was left with other her husband's goods that the said Captain Atkinson's castle which said Brian McCoconagh Maguire is now in Dublin and walketh up and down in the atroots amongst the kings "lolge" people as if he had not robbed any of the English, nor been an actor in the present rebellion at all.

Sworn 4th September 1643 before Henry Brereton and Ed[ward] Pigott. [Examined]

73. William Bignell of Derricree in the county of Fermanagh millwright [(aged about 60 years)] sworn and examined saith that on or about the 23th of October 1641 in the beginning of the present rebellion he was deprived and robbed [or otherwise dispoiled] of his goods chattels and means [of the value and to his loss of one hundred and four score pounds sterling and besides this deponent hath been deprived of and expelled [from] his three farms worth clearly £26 per annum whereof he "accompteth" 3 years profits to be lost worth £78 and he is like to be deprived of the future profits of his farms (worth £26 per annum as aforesaid) until peace be established] [worth £158].

And further saith that the parties rebels hereafter named were those that deprived and dispoiled him of his said goods and chattels and means, and that robbed all his Protestant neighbours in the country thereabouts vizt Art Boy O'Muckian of Darrimachassy in the county of Fermanagh gent, Edmund O'Muckian his eldest son, Loghlin O'Muckian his younger son, Knogher McMartin of Trasney in the same county yeoman Thomas McMartin of Drumlutt yeoman, and Gillise McMartin of the same yeoman brothers, all of the said county and divers others whose names he cannot express. And saith also that other rebels near Cavan also stripped him, his wife and their child, when his wife was great with another child, of all their clothes stark naked and so turned them out in very cold weather so as his wife died of cold before she was delivered and his child also died of cold and want, and himself since "lingring in sicknes" hath hardly escaped with his life. And the deponent for fear of death fled away and saw the dead bodies of three other Protestants that where slain in the way as he fled towards Dublin.

Sworn 16th January 1643 before Henry Jones and Henry Brereton. [Examined]

[Dorcas the wife of John Martin of Corinagee in the county of "Monoghan" sworn and examined saith that her said husband and she were robbed and they and others used and "intreated" so and in such manner and by such persons as her said husband hath in his deposition before deposed and saith further that the rebels named by her husband in his said deposition said that the King writ himself King of "misrule"[?] and had given them commission to do what they did and that there was then no King at all.

Sworn 14th January 1641 before Henry Jones and William Aldrich] [Examined]

74.The deponent Dorothy Rampaine in addition to the former examination saith that her brother Edward May rs ([who lived] [living] within two miles of Newtowne, one Patrick Greene [?] a neighbour came with some company to the said Edward Meyrs house where (after eating and drinking of the best) he told the said Edward that he would possess himself of his house and estate, and took the said Edward out with him to show him a house and garden where he should remain. But having brought him "out a dores" he then and there knocked the said Edward May rs in the head with a spade so as he fell down to the ground and before he was dead, then and there buried him. She further saith that her said husband sending his servant (by name Robert Akqrsley) with a "droave of cattell to be sold in Dublin", he was after the rebellion began at a mill near Palmerstowne in the county of Dublin "seazed" on by the rebels, murdered and then thrown into the river, and so all the money (being about £50) quite lost.

She further saith that by credible report there was drowned by the rebels at Lotherstowne in the county of [ ] the number of 30 Protestants, but by what rebels she cannot tell.

Sworn as above. [Examined]

75. Thomas Hipkiss of Newtowne in the county of Fermanagh [within the half barony of Coole] sworn and examined deposeth that on or about the 25th of October last past "nere 11 a clock in the forenoone" he was robbed by the rebels (who also stripped him his wife and sister) which rebels where Captain Roray Maguire and his followers Hugh McCaule of Killichrehan [?] of the parish of "Newton", with others of his like followers, of [his] goods and chattels [following vizt household goods and apparel worth £14 money £11 [?] of a bond for £6, two cows a horse and a mare worth £6 a lease during his father-in-laws life worth £5 a lease of lands and 6 English cows to it £33 12s. Od. of a debt £13 in all £80 12s. Od.]

And further saith that those rebels that took his goods said that they had the King's Majestys broad seal for doing of it and that they might take our [?] lives as well as our goods. Setting [?] "skeines" and swords to the deponents and his company breasts, threatening to kill them until they had "gotten" all that they had.

Sworn 30th December 1641 Robert Puttock and John Watson. [Examined]

76. Thomas Simpson of Clowneltoh [?] in the parish of Drumully in county of Fermanagh gent, sworn and examined that in the beginning of the present rebellion he this deponent was deprived and robbed and dispoiled of his [goods and chattels] [cattle household goods] ready money profit and benefit of his lease and lands worth £210 sterling by, and by the means of the arch-rebel Rory Maguire and his soldiers and partakers (being a very great number) though he cannot name them: who did also strip him this deponent and his wife and eight children of the clothes and what other means they had.

Sworn ultimo Ju[ ] 1643 before Henry Brereton and Edr[ ] Pigott. [Examined]

77. William Baxter late of Rathmort [ ] in the half barony of Clankelly in county of Fermanagh gent eldest son and heir apparent of Martin Baxter late of Carndallan in the county of Cavan clerk deceased, being duly sworn and examined deposeth and saith that on the 23 "th" day of October last [this deponent's said father was lawfully possessed as in his own right of his own proper goods of 120 head of ca[ttle] in the manor of Armagh on the lands of Rathmoran [?] in the county of Fermanagh worth £180 and 20 horses and mares worth £40 of household stuff at Rathmoram [?] aforesaid worth £10 of corn "sowen" worth £100 of corn in the hagard at Rathmorran aforesaid worth £30 of debts and arrears of rent in the said counties due from such as are in rebellion or robbed by the rebels, and so disabled to make satisfaction £48.

This deponent further saith that he said father was then seized of the manor house and proportion of lands of Armaghe being by estimation 1,000 acres more or less lying in the said barony and county of Fermanagh being purchased lands of inheritance of the clear value and yearly rent of £200 per annum to his said fat[her]. Besides all under [?] estates, held in the said manor of Armagh of his said father and worth to have been sold at the beginning of this rebellion two thousand pounds, which it cost this deponent's father but a lit[tle?] before this rebellion. And that he being thereof so seized [ ] the whole estate goods and lands being in the hands and manag[ment?] of this deponent under his said father, upon the 23"th" day of October last] Rosse McArt Maguire of the said county with other rebels to the number of 10 or upwards (by names unknown to the deponent) apprehended him this deponent at Rathmoran aforesaid, seized upon his [house land chattel corn and household stuff aforenamed] [and his father's goods and estate], turned this deponent and his sister "out a dores", hardly suffering them [to] with escape with their lives and saying that they (meaning the irish had killed all the English in that half barony and that they [had] a broad seal from the King for their so doing, and where everyone to enter upon their own lands whereof they and their predecessors had "bin by plantation" dispossessed, like as the said Rosse Maguire then entered upon the said lands of Rathm[ ] challenging them to have belonged to his father before the said plantation.

This deponent further saith that he hath credibly heard that by reason of this rebellion, and to hinder the rebels from harbour, Sir William Cole of Enniskillen knight had burned this deponent's house [to his damage of at least £60 so that this deponent hath in the said county of Fermanagh suffered the loss of £468 besides one year and a half's rent lost there being £200 per annum, in all to his present loss of £768 pounds. Besides this deponent further saith that his said father was robbed and dispoiled in the county of Cavan by the rebels his neighbours, at and off the land of the corn [?] of household goods to the value of £40 corn in the "hagard" £100 horses worth £25 cows worth £30. But the names and number of the rebels that so robbed him he knoweth not for that he this deponent hearing of their approach before they came in the carne [?] aforesaid fled away.

This deponent further saith that his father's books being worth about £40 where carried to the house of Dennis O'Sheriden "cleark" in the said county, where he feareth they will be lost, and never recovered out of that rebellious county. And that he this deponent left in the county of Cavan at the house of James Gray of the [said] town of Cavan (at such time as this deponent with others beseized in the Castle of Croghan, came the[ ] household goods and wearing apparel worth £30 together with s[uch] of his writings and evidences as he had saved out of the hands of the rebels, all which he feareth are utterly lost as also part which he had made up in the carriages of one that came out of the said Castle but turned back worse [ ]. This deponent further saith that there was taken from his uncle John Warren Belturbett, as he was coming towards Dublin near Cavan, cloth stuff and wearing apparel belonging to this deponent and his sister worth £10, so that his whole certain losses in the said county of Cavan sustained amounted to £280 10s. In both counties to £1048 besides the loss of the rents of his lands till a peace be settled and which will not then answer to near the value that it stands him in. And saith that James Bradie of Tul[ ] in the foresaid county is in rebellion and "oueth" him £30 of the foresaid £48.

Sworn 22nd September 1642 before John Watson William Aldrich and Henry Brereton. [Examined]

78. Edward Erwin of Ballybellfore in the county of Fermanagh gent sworn and examined saith that in the beginning of the present rebellion he this deponent and his father-in-law Fergus Flack were deprived and robbed [and dispoiled] of their estates [consisting of corn cattle horses sheep household goods apparel and other things worth in all 40 pounds. And he is likewise deprived of his employment which before the rebellion began was worth unto him co[ ]ibus annis 30 pounds [?] per annum, one year and a half's profit being lost. And he is like to lose the future profit thereof until a peace be settled and that the parties that so robbed and dispoiled him this deponent were these that follow vizt Rory Maguire Col of the rebels, Donaghie Maguire Sergeant Major to that bloody regiment, Cormuck O'Cagean Redmond oge McMaghan Edmund Maguire of Castloskey [?] and many other soldiers whose names he knoweth not did rob him and his father-in-law and their wives and children and thereafter kept this deponent in prison for the space of 6 months and then he was removed to several prisons and was three times taken out to be hanged but still escaped by gods providence and at length was released by the exchange of Captain McDonnell who was taken prisoner by the garrisons of Eniskilling.

Sworn 15 May 1643 before Henry Brereton and Edr[ ] Pigott. [Examined]

79. Jathnell [?] Mawe [?] of Ferrigrin [in the parish of Drumully] and county of Fermanagh gent [an English protestant aged 44 years or thereabouts] being duly sworn deposeth that he was robbed [of his goods and means] [and lost in cattle worth 86 pounds in corn worth 17 pounds in household goods and provisions within the house 30 pounds in hay worth 4 pounds in due debts 3 pounds 10 shillings in ready monies 9 pounds 16 shillings; his lease of Fergrin (being part of the proportion of Manor Highgate) worth 10 pounds in all amounting to the sum of 160 pounds 6 shillings] [worth 160 pounds 6 shillings] by the means of Captain Rory Maguire of Hasset Towne in the barony of Lurge and county aforesaid, Richard Newgent Esq father-in-law to the Lord Maguire, Hugh McCahall of Drumballaghe in the said county yeoman, and divers others Irish rebels assembled in arms with the said Captain Rory the 23"th" day of October last past in the daytime. And that he, his wife and 5 children were all stripped out of their clothes by the said rebels.

And further deposeth that he heard some of the rebellious Irish Company say that here should not be one English man woman or child left within this kingdom and that they had the king's broad seal for what they did.

Sworn 3 January 1641 before Henry Jones and William Aldrich. [Examined]

80. Richard Morton of Gubb in the county of Fermanagh gent, [being duly sworn and examined upon the holy evangelists] deposeth that since the present rebellion began vizt on or about the 23"th" day of October 1641 he was robbed [stripped] and deprived of all his goods and chattels [and forceably drawn away and thrust out of the possession of his lands tenements and hereditaments], by and by the means of the rebel Captain Rory Maguire of Hassetstowne in the barony of Lurge in the county of Fermanagh, Donagh Maguire Esq uncle to the Lord Maguire, and Richard Newgent Esq father-in-law to the Lord Maguire and divers others of their treacherous and bloody followers who "expulced" this examinant from Gubb aforesaid, and possessed themselves thereof and took away and deprived this examinent of the several goods and particulars hereunder mentioned as followeth, cattle worth 80 pounds corn worth 10 pounds hay worth 10 pounds household goods and provision husband[ry] gear and other goods worth 50 pounds in lease lands worth 250 pounds in all 400 pounds.

And he further deposeth that he his wife and 4 children were all of them stripped of their wearing "apparrell nere Butlersbridge" by some of the Irish belonging to Phillip McHume McShane O'Rely the 27th [?] day of October aforesaid, and left naked to the cold air.

Sworn 15 May 1643 before Henry Brereton and John Sterne. [Examined].

81. Damell Morris of Callaghill in the county of Fermanagh "taylor" [sworn and examined] deposeth [and saith] that [in and] since the beginning of the present rebellion and by means thereof one William Bristoe late of Derrivony in the county of Cavan gent this deponent's near kinsman was at Derryvony [?] aforesaid and elsewhere deprived [robbed] and dispoiled of his goods chattels and estate worth 300 pounds at least by the rebels Daniell Buy O'Mulpatrick of Gilloone in the county of Fermanagh gent Hugh McFrale O'Mulpatrick of Cuivy [?] in the county of Cavan, John Reagh O'Mulpatrick of or about Knocknynny and others that the deponent cannot name, which rebels or some of them now do or lately did usurp and possess two poles of land belonging unto him the said William Bristoe called the Cuivy and the Coragh, worth 20 pounds per annum yearly.

And further saith that the said William Bristoe was among other 600 soldiers slain by the rebels in their "martch" from Dublin towards Tredarth.

Sworn 18 August 1643 before Henry Jones and Edr[ ] Pigott. [Examined].

82. James S[l]emin of Corneholah [?] in the county of Fermanagh yeoman aged 28 years or thereabouts being duly sworn and examined saith that on the 22nd day of October 1641 he was robbed and [stripped] [deprived] by James oge McJames McDon Maguire of Ballymacgilldacome [?] in the said county gent and John Roe McThomas McDon Maguire of the same gent, Phelim More Magowran (a 'bomon gamster") and Owen McPatrick Duffe Maguiro of Mullihewby[?] in the same county and divers others of the half barony of Knocknynny in the county aforesaid they belonging all unto Captain Rory Maguire of all [these] lands goods and chattels [worth 216 pounds] [as followeth vizt one small tate called Cornahala [?] holden in fee farm being in the proportion of Dresternan in the county aforesaid worth (ulta rep[ ]) per annum 8 pounds, which before the rebellion was worth to be sold "fowr score powndes sterling"; and also a parcel of land called Dronekellan [?] in the proportion aforesaid, which the deponent had in lease for 21 years and being now esteemed nothing worth the landlord's rent paid [?]) but before the rebellion was to be sold 20 pounds sterling; cows horses young cattle sheep hogs household stuff weaving clothes ready money debts due to him and books the whole [?] sum [?] and value amounting to 210 pounds sterling].

And further the said James deposeth that the parties above-named who robbed him commanded him the said James, and the rest of his household to depart the "cuntry" without any delay, otherwise they would murder them. And for taking away of his goods and his banishment they did allege that they had his majesty's commission under his hand and seal for their "awthority" to take away [ ] his goods.

And further saith that he knoweth the parties hereafter mentioned to be in rebellion vizt Felim Duff McRory MaGu[ire] of Goolen gent, Brian McThomas Reogh Maguire of Leagan gent, Turlogh Maguire son to the said Brian, Brian oge Maguire son to the said Brian, John oge Gealan of Leagan yeoman, Garrett O'Rely of Aghnolla [?] yeoman, Rory Ballagh McCassedy of Toryroe [?] "surgion" Grany ny Maguire daughter to Hugh McShane Boy Maguire of Kinmin in the same county gent, all these men above written dwelling in the county of Fermanagh in the half barony of Knockniny being followers to Captain Rory Maguire.

Sworn 6 June 1642 before John Sterne and William Hitchcock. [Examined]

83. Thomas S[l]eaman of Relly [?] in the county of Fermanagh weaver [aged 22 years or thereabouts being duly] sworn and examined saith that on the 23"th" of October 1641 he was robbed and stripped by Fleartagh McThomas McDon Maguire and Cormuck McThomas Duff McCory and John McFelim McCory, Brian McRory McDon Maguire Owney McCaffery, Tirlogh McCabe and divers others of the half barony of Knockniny in the county aforesaid (they being all followers and belonging to Captain Rory Maguire) of all these lands goods and chattels [vizt of the profits of the small tate of Rely, and a parcel of land called Goale being held in fee farm and in the proportion of Aghaland in the county aforesaid worth (vlta repras[ ] per annum 5 pounds 7 shillings sterling in money and debts 16 pounds sterling].

And the said Thomas deposeth that the parties abovementioned who robbed him wished him the said Thomas to depart the country without any delay (after they had robbed him) or otherwise they would murder him and for the taking away of his goods and his banishment out of the country they did allege that they had the king's commission for their authority to take away his goods, and all the rest of the Englishmen's goods.

And further saith that he knoweth the parties hereafter mentioned to be in open rebellion vizt Felim Duff McRory Maguire of Goolun gent Brian McThomas Roe Maguire of Llegan gent Turlogh Maguire son to Brian Maguire of Llegan, John Agaldon of Legan Garrett O'Rely, Rory Ballaghe McCosse surgeon, Garrett O'Rely of Agheollah Owny ny Maguire daughter to Hugh McShane Boy Maguire of Kinmine [?] Edmund O'Rely of Canaughterragh, Patrick O'Dolan of Tirarow [?] Rory O'Frantie of Drunelutt, Shane McFarragh McCorry of Kinemine Felim oge Maguire of Dronemully gent John Maguire of Derry Philip Duff O'Rely Daniell oge O'Mulpatrick, of Aghakdmadry, Brian oge son to the said Daniell O'Mulpatrick, Edmund Maguire of Derykenon, Connor McRory Boy of Carna Maguire Brian McNa Neye of Dronanymore yeoman Art [ ] McMoraghe of Derryconleny William McMoroghe of Derrycoran son to Art Duff McMorragh William McFeragh McCary of Kinnine all followers of Captain Rory Maguire and belonging to him and of the county of Fermanagh in the half barony of Knockninny.

Sworn 6 June 1642 before William Hitchcock and Henry Brereton. [Examined]

84. Daniell Morris of Callaghill in the county of Fermanagh yeoman [aged 33 years or thereabouts being duly [sworn] [and examined] saith that on the 23"th" day of October 1641 he was expelled and dispoiled by the rebels John and [ ] McThomas McDon Maguire, Dunn Maguire, Patrick oge Maguire, Phillip Roe Maguire and divers others of the half barony of Knockninney in the county aforesaid (they being all followers and belonging unto Captain Rory Maguire) of all his lands goods and chattels [as foll[oweth] vizt the 8th part of a great tate of land called Dronborie [?] formell and Canouteraghy [?] in fee farm forever; and a lease being in the proportion of Aghaloin in the county aforesaid worth vlt[ina] repri[ ]s per annum 5 pounds 10 shillings sterling, and is like to lose the future profits thereof until a peace be settled and until the value of land be raised to that it hath "bin" formerly worth; in household stuff worth 20 pounds; in wearing apparel worth 5 pounds in hay and corn worth 15 pounds in debts and ready money worth 40 pounds in all 80 pounds sterling] [to his loss of 80 pounds].

And further deposeth that the parties abovenamed who robbed him wished him, the said Daniel and the rest of his household to depart the country within [?] a day or two after they had robbed him, or otherwise they would murder them; and for the taking away of his goods and banishment out of the country they did allege they had the king's commission for their authority to take away his goods etc.

And further saith that William Bristow deceased late of Drivone in the county of Cavan his "cozen german" (to whom he is next kinsman in this kingdom) was also by the rebels deprived of his goods and means worth 300 pounds at the least and himself slain by the rebels [and was also so forceably driven off 2 parcels of land called the Quivy and Carragh in the county of Cavan worth clearly 20 pounds per annum whereof he "accompteth" 3 years profits to be lost amounting to 60 pounds besides the future profits].

And further saith that all the parties hereafter mentioned are in rebellion vizt Call Maguire of Aghanackloe gent John McFelim Duffe Maguire of Knockniny gent Brian McAlone of Gortin yeoman Art Boy O'Muckean of Derymacahasie yeoman, Owen O'Moran of Dery yeoman, Edmund More McCabe of Dromelict yeoman Patrick Duff Maguire of Moolerby gent, Owin Maguire McPatrick Duff his son Patrick Keavagh Maguire of Mullerby gent all of the half barony of Knockninny and county of Fermanagh and others whose names he now remembers not.

Sworn 6 June 1642 before William Hitchcock, John Sterne and Henry Brereton. [Examined]

And this deponent Daniell Morris being further examined saith that William Bagnall late of Derricree in the county of Fermanagh in the beginning of the present rebellion was robbed and deprived by the rebels of his goods and estate amounting to 200 pounds and that the said William Bagnall since made his last will and testament and thereof made the deponent so executor and gave him all his lands goods and chattels whatsoever and saith that Amy the deponent's mother died since the rebellion began of cold and want. Sworn as above. [Examined]

85. Mathias Knolton of Mullaghanagoan in the parish of Newtowne and county of Fermanagh yeoman [and Suzan Hayes widow] [being duly] sworn and examined saith that before the new rebellion began he was [possessed of four [?] beasts [?] worth 12 pounds 10 shillings or thereabouts, and of a lease horses household stuff and other goods and chattels worth 137 pounds 10 shillings or thereabouts and being so possessed went for England leaving his wife and children behind him in possession thereof and being in possession thereof whilst he was so in England where [ ]] by the rebels robbed stripped and dispossessed of all his said goods and chattels [worth 137 pounds] and by reason of the coldness of the weather and want [his wife and children died] [they died before his coming over]. But who the parties were that so robbed or dispoiled him or them he knows not [because he was absent as aforesaid] but leaveth the relation thereof to a deponent, Suzan Hayes the wife of John Heys late of Newtowne alias Castlecoole which said Suzan [being sworn and examined also] thereunto saith that the parties rebels that so robbed the said Kmathias Knolton and his wife and children was the same that robbed this deponent's husband and her of all their goods, and were thus named, Captain Rory Maguire of Hassettowne in the county of Fermanagh Esq Donogh Maguire uncle to the said Rory Maguire Cohonogh Maguire, uncle to the said Donogh one [ ] Newgent who married the mother of the said Rory Maguire [ ] Grymes Lieutenant who lived near Mr Christopher Coats within the parish of Newtowne late mustermaster of the king's forces but then turned rebel, and many others of their wicked and rebellious crew whose names he cannot now express.

And further saith that she hath heard read and knoweth to be true her said husband's deposition formerly taken before his majesty's commissioners concerning his losses and the passages in this rebellion. And that (over and besides those expressions) she (to her great "greefe") too well knoweth that the rebels surprised her eldest son and that they keep him still as a prisoner amongst them or otherwise have slain him as she "thincketh".

Sworn 17 June 1642 before Henry Brereton and William Hitchcock.

86. Richard Sharman of Lehinch within the barony of Coole and county of Fermanagh deposeth that he [had in] was robbed of a good] personal estate when this rebellion first began [worth 105 pounds] [the lease of Lehinch aforesaid worth 10 pounds cows old and young worth 41 pounds horses and mares worth 12 pounds corn and hay worth 11 pounds household goods worth 20 pounds [?] and ready money worth 20 shillings in all 105 pounds all which were taken from him and lost] about the 24th of October 1641 by the servants of Rory Maguire a rebel who told this deponent that their master Rory had a commission for it from the king, and by other rebels in his company.

Sworn 16 February 1641 before John Sterne and William Aldrich. [Examined]

87. Examined Robert Walker of Bun in the parish of Drumully in the county of Fermanagh yeoman [aged 32 years or thereabouts being duly] sworn and examined saith that about the 24th of October last and past 1641, he and his wife were [ ] and stripped by Patrick O'Murris Patrick O'Donogh Owen [ ] O'Mulpatrick, Nicholas Brady Brian O'Donoghwee brothers unto the said Call, Daniell McGillmartin and others of the county aforesaid they being followers unto Captain Rory Maguire of all their [goods and means worth 55 pounds] [leases in goods as followeth vizt one lease of the tate of Bun aforesaid for 28 years yet unexpired worth 10 pounds [ ] claro per annum, lost thereby for one year the said rent, besides wh[atever] he may hereafter lose, "tenn" English cows and one soull [?] worth 18 pounds sterling in young cattle 4 pounds one mare and horse 3 pounds in household [stuff] worth 6 pounds in corn and hay worth 12 pounds in all 55 pounds].

And further the said Robert deposeth that the aforesaid rebels did allege that they had the king's broad seal for the taking of all English men's ar[ms] within the county aforesaid.

Sworn 2 June 1642 before Henry Brereton and Rau[ ] Adams. [Examined]

88. [Frances Knight of the Garrison in the parish of Rosember in the county of Fermanagh aged 57 years or thereabouts, duly sworn saith that before these late troubles her husband Alexander Knight (being a founder of iron works) departed from the said Garrison (upon some discontent given him by a master of the works) to seek for work, since which time and before the said troubles this deponent was credibly informed that her said husband was dead. This deponent thereupon took her journey from the said Garrison towards the city of Dublin on "Tewsdaie" the 12th day of October last, with intent to take a house in the city for herself and a daughter-in-law of hers, this deponent, so to live together there, but so did pleased god it fell out that the very next day after this deponent set forth from the said Garrison being the 13th day of October she was robbed of 25 shillings by one C[ ] oge Cormuck oge and his company (who had "bin" out long before and wood kerne, robbing of people). And this deponent had "bin" quite "stript" by them but that she had some knowledge of them by means of one Mr Harding of the Garrison from whom she had a token to "vse her kindely if shee should light in their hands". So that when god had sent this deponent safe to Dublin she had not "bin" here above "fowre daies" before the general conspiracy and insurrection was discovered which hath caused this deponent to stay in this city ever since and hath separated this deponent and her said daughter-in-law and hath likewise separated this deponent and her goods left at the said Garrison, as pewter brasse iron "vessells" and other implements of iron, bedding with "curtens and valens [?] lynen and wolen" to the value of at least 20 pounds sterling which she this deponent is out of hope ever to see again.

Sworn 11 January 1641 before John Sterne and William Hitchcock. [Examined]

89. Thomasin Pulsford of Carnhone in the parish of Clone and county of Fermanagh wife to John Pulsford yeoman (being now in Eniskilling in the said county in restraint by this late rebellion) [of the age of 26 years or thereabouts being duly sworn] deposeth that on the 23"th" of October 1641 (her husband aforesaid being then from home) she, this deponent, was then robbed and spoiled of all their personal estate [worth 76 pounds 2 shillings] [vizt corn worth 12 shillings cattle 29 pounds sterling [?] household stuff apparel rugs money and provision 37 pounds sterling, and in the proper goods of Mrs [?] Anne Heigate the relict of James Bishop of Kiltanorah the value of 8 pounds sterling; also in hay and "husbandrie tooles" 30 shillings, in all the sum of 76 pounds 2 shillings sterling] and all by the means of Hugh McCulle and others under the command of Rory Maguire of Hassettown in the county aforesaid esq. And therewith not content, but on the 26th day of the month afore said this deponent was most barbarously and "inhumanely stript of all her apparell" by one Shane Duff of Karry and others of the said rebels, whose names this deponent knows not. And at that time she heard some of the said rebels say that the king gave them licence to kill all the Englishmen and to "stripp" the women but not to kill them.

Sworn 15 January 1641 before Henry Brereton and William Hitchcock. [Examined]

90. Margaret Wilson widow a relict of Thomas Wilson late of Newtowne in the parish of Drumully in the county of Fermanagh sworn saith that on or about the 23"d" of October last this deponent's husband (then alive) and she were robbed and dispoiled of their goods and chattels [hereafter mentioned vizt household goods worth 14 pounds beasts and cattle [worth] 7 pounds hay and corn worth 4 pounds in debts 2 pounds [?] and were expulsed [from] so much land there as was clearly worth 6 pounds per annum; and that [?] parties <!-- Unreadable Word --> rebola that so robbed and "<!-- Unreadable Word --> expulced" them were] [by] Rory Maguire "stiled" a Captain and his company who also burned their house at Newtowne, and stripped them and their child of all or the most of their clothes. And about a fortnight after her husband together with Abraham James and many others was murdered near Yoghall in the county of Cavan by the rebels called the O'Relies and their "complicees and souldiers".

Sworn 17 January 1641 before William Aldrich and John Sterne. [Examined]

91. Mary Tildisley widow of the parish of Newtowne in the county of Fermanagh sworn and examined deposeth [and saith] that about the 23"d" of October last Rory Maguire and Patrick McDonnell captains with their soldiers robbed and dispoiled this dep[onents] husband vizt of [his goods and estate] [horses and cowsworth 100 pounds "pinns" and other tools belonging to his trade worth 60 pounds household stuff and provision worth 100 pounds apparel worth 50 pounds money and jewels of hers [and of] her children's worth about 30 pounds; in bills and bonds formerly due in England and Ireland coming to 243 pounds].

She further deposeth that her said husband and her son-in-law were murdered by Captain McDonnell's soldiers, rebels vizt by Adam McCaffery of Knockballimore Castle, and Brian and John his sons and others that she knoweth not.

And [ ] she heard them often that what they did they were authorised by the King of England and had his broad seal to show for. She further deposeth that she had leases taken from her by them of land of England to the value of 600 pounds sterling.

Sworn 29 January 1641 before John Sterne and William Aldrich. [Examined]

92. John Kershaw late of Dristany in the half barony of Knockninny and county of Fermanagh "lynen weaver" [aged "fowrscore and fowrteene yeres" or thereabouts as sworn and examined] deposeth and saith that he this deponent about 2 weeks since was at Dristany aforesaid robbed and dispoiled of his goods [and means worth 50 pounds] [to the values following vizt in cattle "garrons" household stuff and other goods all worth 50 pounds at least by the soldiers of Rory Maguire their captain being above] [by the soldiers of Captain Rory Maguire being above 30 in number] whose names he knows not, which rebels said to this deponent's son-in-law and others (as they told him) that they would have this deponent's head if they could find him. As they (by his flight) did not, for otherwise he thinks they would have done it. But missing him they burned his house and 3 or 4 more neighbours houses, the said rebels saying (as this deponent was credibly told) that they had the king's broad seal to take the cattle of the English and did drive them out of the land.

Sworn 8 January 1641 before John Sterne and Henry Brereton. [Examined]

93. Thomas Sanders of Dromebrockus in the parish of Glenally in the barony of [ ] in the county of Fermanagh [a Brittish protestant being duly sworn] deposeth that about the 25th October last past 1641 at the place aforesaid the said deponent was robbed by the natives of the kingdom [of all his goods worth 90 pounds] [in corn and hay worth 10 pounds in cattle cows and "hoggs" 40 pounds in household stuff 10 pounds in a lease of lands being built 30 pounds in all 90 pounds. And this robbery was done] by Morris O'Casidy of the said place Patrick Broome and Ed[mun]d O'Printy, Neale O'Printy Remen oge Maccamly and Owen Boy of the same parish and their families, who also stripped this deponent his wife and 5 children of their apparel exposing them to be starved by the cold. And the said Remon oge threatened to kill this deponent's wife and he also "spake theis traiterous words" that they did those things by the king's authority who gave them power not only to take away their wealth, but also to kill them. [And the abovenamed rebels did also rob and take from this deponent 25 cows of the goods of Francis Silliard of the said parish which were left in the deponent's hands worth 50 pounds].

Sworn 7 January 1641 before John Sterne and William Hitchcock. [Examined]

94. George Gascoine of Totnegaland in the parish of "Clownis" and barony of Clonkelly in the county of Fermanagh gent deposeth [ ] and saith] that the 23"th" day of October last he was [robbed of goods and chattels [possessed of cattle containing [?] 23 head of young and old worth 32 pounds, 4 mares and a horse worth 10 pounds, wheat oats "ry and barly" worth 10 pounds household stuff worth 20 pounds one "leas yeilding" him 6 pounds per annum (besides the rent) for 40 years to come worth 40 pounds and the same was] taken from him by Brian Moder [?] Maguire and at the same time they murdered and killed Thomas Cheetam William Ogden Th[ ] Sergeant and Henry Crosse.

Sworn 4 January 1641 before Henry Brereton and William Aldrich. [Examined]

95. Barbary Morton wife to Richard Morton of Gubb in the parish of Drumully [barony of Coole] and County of Fermanagh, now a soldier in His Majesty's service at Drogheda yeoman [(she being an English Protestant) aged 27 years or thereabouts being duly sworn] deposeth that her husband was robbed and lost [his goods and chattels] one lease of the tate of land called Gubb part of the man[or] of Castle Brinsley alias Castlecoole being for the term of 91 years from May Day last, at and under the annual or yearly rent of 24 shillings worth £25 [?] 'in cattle worth £80 in corn worth £10 [?] in hay worth £10 in household goods provision husbandry gear and other goods worth £50] in all amounting [in value] to £400 by the means of Captain Rory Maguire of Hassettowne in the barony of Lurge and County aforesaid and other Irish men that took up arms and did rise in rebellion with him on or about the 23"th" day of October last in the night time. And that she her husband and children getting a cott, passed to Belturbett by water the night, and that she and her husband the 27th of the said month were "stript" and robbed of their clothes in the County of Cavan by some Irish rebels of the company of Phillip McHugh McShane O'Rely.

And further deposeth that she had heard of a great company of English Protestants that lived in good manner within the said parish of Dromully that were murdered and slain by the company of the said Captain Rory to the number of 40 or thereabouts and that she "verely beleeveth" that there is above 100 of the said parishioners that lived in good manner within the said parish, since they where banished and driven from their habitations by the said rebels, by the means of their cruelty perished and dead: and her reason is because she hath known them to die in such abundance daily that she thinks there cannot but be more dead, she knowing most of them well, they being her neighbours and parishioners vitz William Gourden William Perkins William Winsore Anne Buttevant Jeffrey Buttevant William Benington George [ ] Ward Richard West and divers others.

Sworn 3rd January before Henry Jones and William Aldrich. [Examined]

96. Ann Band of Roly in the County of Fermanagh widow sworn and examined saith that since the beginning of the present rebellion vizt about the 23"t" of October 1641 she this deponent and her husband who was then alive where [expelled] deprived and dispoiled of [their goods and means] [the (?) possession rents and profits of their farms which they held for long terms of years, yet in being, in the proportion of Aghalan [?] worth £20 per annum clearly besides the rent paid for the same, one years profit whereof she "accompteth" to be lost worth £20 as aforesaid. And she is like to be deprived of and lose the future profits thereof until a peace be established, and of cows horses mares and colts worth £182, of corn hay household stuff wearing apparel ready money and debts owing by the robbed English [£194 sterling losses] amounting in all to the sum of] worth £400 sterling [besides her] future loss aforesaid.

And further saith that the parties that so deprived robbed and dispoiled her, and her said husband, are all rebels, and thus named vizt Patrick Ballaghe McCorry farmer, and Farrell McCorry farmer, Thomas Roe McCorry and Cale McCorry Tirlogh O'Rely and Farrell McCorry, and John McFarrell McCorry William McFarrell McCorry Loughlin Kepage McMoroghe, Brian McCabba, all of the half barony of Knocknynny in the said County of Fermanagh and divers others, being all soldiers and followers to Captain Roray Maguire, who bade this deponent and her family depart the country without delay otherwise they would murder them saying they had good authority to take the English goods and banish them, or to that effect, since which time her husband went with the 600 soldiers [tores] Tredarth and was (as she is "verelly" persuaded slain in the "martch".)

Sworn 9th [?] July 1642 before Henry Brereton and William Hitchcock [Examined]

97. Mary Benington of Killeclowne [in the parish of Drumully half barony of Coole] and county of Fermanagh widow, the relict of William Bennington [gent] deceased [she being of the age of 40 years or thereabouts, and duly sworn] deposeth that her said husband William Bennington was robbed and dispoiled [of his goods worth] of his [goods at Killeclowne aforesaid of the several values following: in cattle worth £27 16s. Od. in corn worth 20 shillings in hay worth 40 shillings in household goods provision for the house and other goods worth £12, one lease of the half tate of land called Killeclowne being part and parcel of the manor of Castle Brinsley alias Castlecoole for [ ] years or thereabouts from May Day last at and under the yearly rent of £7 worth £10; in monies £3 8s. Od. in all amounting to the sum of £56 4s. Od. vizt of the household goods provision and other goods and his writings] [£56] the 23 of October last, half an "hower" after sun setting by Thomas Maguire of Killelahard [?] in the said half barony and county aforesaid gent, Hugh Maguire of the same gent Patrick O'Morris of Kilturk in the half barony and county aforesaid gent Manus Maguire of the said half barony and county aforesaid gent [Manus Maguire of the said] and divers others Irish persons to the number of 20 or thereabouts; and of other goods as cattle and corn the 24th day of the same month upon the day time, about ten of the clock in the "foornoone" by the said Manus Maguire, Shane McCaffrie and Edmund McCaffrie of Dromlone in the said half barony and county and other irish persons in their company to the number of 4 or 5 whose names this deponent knoweth not. And of [the said] [£3 8s. Od. in] monies by John Beaton of the proportion of Derriana and county aforesaid a Scottish man the 24th day of October aforesaid.

And further deposeth that some of the said rebels in this deponent hearing said that they had the King's broad seal for what they did. And further deposeth that her said husband herself and 4 small children where "stript" of all their clothes near Yoghall in the County of Cavan the 27th day of October aforesaid by some irish rebels, whose names this deponent knoweth not, in the afternoon of the same day. And since her said husband and two of her children are dead in this city and her other 2 children lie very sick and weak, and not likely to live, all by the means of the cold and hunger they did undergo by the bad "vsages" of the said rebels as she "verely beleaveth" and her reason is for that they have all "bin" sick and have not enjoyed their health since they were "stript" by the said rebels as aforesaid.

Sworn 7th January 1641 before Roger Puttock and John Sterne. [Examined]

98. Elizabeth Parker wife to Thomas Parker of Gararousky [in the parish of Drumully half barony of Coole] and county of Fermanagh [aged 20 years or thereabouts] (her said husband being a soldier that did go down towards Droghedah under the command of Captain Edward Aldrich) [she being duly sworn] deposeth that on the 23rd day of October last her said husband was robbed [of goods and chattels worth £27] [and lost in cattle worth £15 10s. Od. in household goods provision for the house and other goods worth £11 10s. Od. in all amounting to the sum of £27] by the means of Captain Rory Maguire of Hassettowne in the county of Fermanagh aforesaid and other Irish rebels that did rise in rebellion with him.

And further deposeth that she and her said husband was both "stript" and their clothes taken from them by some of the rebellious company of the said Captain Rory the five and twentieth day of October aforesaid at or near the church of Newtowne.

[And further deposeth] that she heard some of the said company say that what they had done or did, they had the King's hand for the same or words to that effect. And [further saith that] she had credibly heard that one Mr Bulman, one lun and a third person (all English Protestants) where then or about the same time slain by the rebels.

Sworn 4th January 1641 before Henry Jones and John Watson. [Examined]

99. Margaret the relict of Jefferey Buttevant late of Blenish [in the parish of Drumully barony of Coole] and County of Fermanagh gent deceased [being an English Protestant aged 49 years or thereabouts] being [duly sworn] deposeth that her said husband was robbed and lost in [goods and chattel] [leases the worth of £40 in cattle worth £100 in hay and corn worth £7 in household goods provision for the house husbandry gear and other goods worth £70 in silver, plate and jewels £20 in reading money £8 in all amounting to] [the value of] two hundred forty-five pounds by the means of Captain Rory Maguire of Hassettowne in the barony of Lurge and county aforesaid and other Irish rebels that did rise into rebellion with him the 23 "th" day of October last in the afternoon a little before sun setting.

And further deposeth that the said rebels robbed this deponent's said husband of all his writing, some of them containing his right and estate of certain lands lying within the township of Kilbroughe in the county of Stafford in England. And [further deposeth] that her said husband herself and 3 children where all "stript" in the county of Cavan by the rebels there of all their clothes and that her husband afterwards perished and died near unto the bull in the said county of Cavan in his journey towards this city. And since she and her children came to this city one of them is dead and the other two in great danger of death, all through the misery they have undergone and were put unto by the said rebels.

Sworn 4th January 1641 before Henry Jones Rau[ ] Adams and Henry Brereton. [Examined]

100. Stephen Cooke of Mullanecroughe [in the parish of Kinnawly half barony of Knockninny] and County of Fermanagh yeoman [aged 41 years or thereabouts being duly sworn] deposeth that he was robbed and lost the 23 "th" day of October last about 2 or 3 "howres" within night all his goods [and chattels worth £116] [of the values following in cattle worth £60 in corn worth £4 in hay worth £5 in household goods provision and other goods worth £20 one lease of Mullenecoughe for these 30 years from May last at or under the yearly rent of £3 6s. 8d., being part of the proportion of Aghalane worth £25 in all amounting to the sum of £116] by Edm[un]d O'Brogan of Derrivore in the said half barony and county yeoman, Donell McGivany of the same yeoman, Turlogh oge Maguire of the said half barony gent, and divers other Irishmen in their company, whose names this [deponent] knoweth not to the number of 16 or thereabouts, saying that if he this deponent, his wife and children would not presently leave the land they would kill him. And for what they did they had the King's authority.

Sworn 7th January 1641 before Henry Brereton and William Aldrich.

101. Agnes Winsor late wife to William Winsor of Agh[ ]enehinch [in the parish of Drumully half barony of Coole] and county of Fermanagh, [Examined].

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