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The McLaughlin Kings of Aileach

The McLaughlin Kings of Aileach

    The free chieftainships of Aileach were:

 

   1.  Magh Ith  (the territory south of Inishowen in Donegal)

   2.  The Craebh  (Now the Barony of Keenaught in Londonderry County)

   3.  Cinel-Conaill  (the rest of Donegal)

   4.  Tuloch-og  (now Tullyhoge, or Tullaghoge, near Cookstown in Tyrone County)

   5.  Inish-Eoghainn (or the Inishowen Peninsula of Donegal County)

 

 The Kings of Aileach were inaugurated Kings at Tuloch-0g, by the O'Hagans,

on a stone coronation chair at the site.  In later years, after the destruction of Aileach by

Murchertach O'Brien in 1101, (or perhaps even earlier, by 1050) the Kings of the North

of Ireland moved their capital to Tuloch-og in Tyrone County.  Other sources say they first

moved to the vicinity of Inish Enaigh near Strabane in Tyrone. Sometime during the reign of

Domnall MacLochlainn (+1121), High King of Ireland, the McLaughlins moved their great house

to Derry, while their rivals, the O'Neills, remained in Tuloc-og.

 The Kingdom of Aileach had lost some of its early grandeur by the 12th century,

after the Normans had moved into parts of Ulster and controlled vast territories

in the North of Ireland.  The appelation "King of Aileach" was still used by

the Annalists, but more often the term "King of Cinel-Eoghainn," or "King

of the kindred of Owen" became used in its place, in tacit recognition of the advances

of the Normans beginning in about 1177.


The McLaughlin Kings of Aileach 1051-2141 A.D.

Ardgar MacLochlainn expelled from kingship of Tulach-og, 1051;
(son. of Lochlan) King of Aileach, died at Tuloch-og, buried at Armagh
in the mausoleum of the Kings, 1064

Domnall Ua Lochlainn took the kingship of the Cinel-Eoghainn, 1083;

King of (s. of Ardgar) Aileach, 1088; Archking of Ireland, Died at Derry, 1121

Nial Ua Lochlainn King of Cinel-Conaill, 1013; died 1119
(s. of Domnall)

Maghnus MacLochlainn Lord of the Cinel-Eoghainn and of the North, slain 1128
(s. of Domnall)

Conchobhar MacLochlainn King of Aileach and King of all the North, slain 1136
(s. of Domhnall)

Muirchertach MacLochlainn. Expelled from chieftainship of Cinel-Eoghain, 1143; at the (s. of Nial, ggs. of Lochlan) head of the Cinel-Eoghain, 1147; King of Ireland, 1150;


King of Aileach and Tara, 1152; First year over Ireland,
1156; Archking of Ireland, built Church of Derry, 1164;
slain 1166, buried at Armagh.

Nial Ua Lochlainn Tirowen divided by Rory O'Connor; part north of mountain
Callain to Nial MacLochlainn; south part to Aedh Ua Neill, 1167

Conchobhar Ua Lochlainn Kingship of the Cinel-Eoghainn, 1169; slain at Armagh, 1170

Maelsechlainn MacLochlainn King of the Cinel-Eoghainn. 1176; slain by foreigners, 1185

Domnall MacLochlainn Deposed (from leadership of Cinel-Eoghainn), 1186;
(s. of Aedh) King of Aileach; slain 1188; buried in Armagh

Muirchertach MacLochlainn King of Cinel-Eoghain; slain; buried at Derry, 1196
(s. of Muirchertach)

Conchobhar MacLochlain Aedh Ua Neill deposed; Conor erected Lord of Cinel-Eoghainn
('the little') Cinel-Eoghainn, slain 1201

Domnall MacLochlainn King of Cinel-Eoghainn, 1232; resumed lordship, 1234;
deposed by Normans, 1238; regained lordship at battle of
Carn-Siadhaill, 1239; slain at battle of Caim Eirge, 1241

 


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